MASS SCHEDULE: 13 - 20 July
SAINT
JOSEPH CHURCH
GIRARDVILLE

Saturday, 12 July
Vigil of Sunday
05:30 pm — ANTHONY GREGAS
by Maurice, Diane and Maura McDonald

Sunday, 13 July
15th Sunday in Ordinary Time
11:30 am — JAMES CANAVAN
by his sister, Ida Mae

Monday, 14 July
St. Kateri Tekakwitha, virgin (OblMem)
08:00 am — JENNIE DeLUCA
by Celeste DeLuca

Wednesday, 16 July
Our Lady of Mount Carmel (OptMem)
08:00 am — CECELIA GALAT SMITH
by her daughter, Carol Smith Bender

Friday, 18 July
St. Camillus deLellis, priest (OptMem)
08:00 am — ISABELLE BIRSTER MARESKI
rescheduled from 27 June

Saturday, 19 July
Weekday
08:00 am — CECELIA GALAT SMITH
by Barbara Snitzer
Vigil of Sunday
05:30 pm — TERESA MAHANOY
by Jean Birster Weist

Sunday, 20 July
16th Sunday in Ordinary Time
11:30 am — ROSALIE BARRETT JAMBETER
by Patricia Kowalick

 MASS SCHEDULE: 13 - 20 July
SAINT
VINCENT dePAUL CHURCH
GIRARDVILLE 
     

Saturday, 12 July
Vigil of Sunday
04:00 pm — JAMES J. GOWNLEY
by Virginia Chillis and family

Sunday, 13 July
15th Sunday in Ordinary Time
08:30 am — DECEASED: HOLY NAME SOCIETY
by the HNS

Tuesday, 15 July
St. Bonaventure, bishop, doctor (OblMem)
08:00 am — MARLENE KLECKNER MARQUARDT PARFITT
by John and Barbara Petrousky

Thursday, 17 July
Weekday
07:00 pm — EUGENE ZDIERA
by Josephine Zdiera

Saturday, 19 July
Vigil of Sunday
04:00 pm — LOUIS, POLDIE and WALTER YURENKA
by Bernice Yackera
Sunday, 20 July
16th Sunday in Ordinary Time
08:30 am — ELEANOR CONNELL
by the Connell family

stjos/stvdp: 07.13.2014 - 01


COLLECTION TOTALS FROM LAST WEEKEND:
05 / 06 JULY


Saint Joseph Parish
:
Receipts for parish purposes: $730.00 from the Sunday envelopes; $37.00 from the plate; $168.00 from the Dues envelopes; $6.00 from the Building maintenance envelopes; $53.00 from the loose.
Total: $994.00
Receipts for non-parish purposes: — 0 —
Analysis: When one deducts from the total of the receipts for parish purposes ($994.00) our weekly financial obligation to the Diocese, i.e. assessments ($269.31), plus our weekly premium for various insurances ($311.91), plus our weekly subsidy to Trinity Academy ($358.17), the sum total of which is $939.39, one sees that $54.61 is available from this collection for operating the parish.

Saint Vincent dePaul Parish:
Receipts for parish purposes: $791.00 from the Sunday envelopes; $31.00 from the plate; $190.00 from the Dues envelopes; $92.00 from the loose.
Total: $1,104.00
Receipts for non-parish purposes: — $10.00 from the Peter’s Pence envelopes —
Analysis: When one deducts from the total of the receipts for parish purposes ($1,104.00) our weekly financial obligation to the Diocese, i.e. assessments ($231.00), plus our weekly premium for various insurances ($336.72), plus our weekly subsidy to Trinity Academy ($250.98), the sum total of which is $818.70, one sees that $285.30 is available from this collection for operating the parish.

CONFESSION SCHEDULE THIS WEEK

Tuesday, 15 July
02:30 to 3:30 pm
St. Vincent dePaul Church

Thursday, 17 July
06:00 to 07:00 pm
St. Vincent dePaul Church

Friday, 18 July
06:30 to 07:30 pm
St. Joseph Chapel

EXPOSITION OF THE BLESSED SACRAMENT

Tuesday, 15 July
02:00 to 04:00 pm
St. Vincent dePaul Church
Scripture Rosary at about 03:40 pm
concluding with Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament

Friday, 18 July
06:00 to 08:00 pm
St. Joseph Chapel
Vespers (Evening Prayer) at about 07:30 pm
followed by Chaplet of Divine Mercy,
concluding with Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament

stjos/stvdp: 07.13.2014 - 02


FR. Z’S 20 TIPS FOR MAKING A GOOD CONFESSION

We should…
1) …examine our consciences regularly and thoroughly;
2) …wait our turn in line patiently;
3) …come at the time confessions are scheduled, not a few minutes before they are to end;
4) …speak distinctly but never so loudly that we might be overheard;
5) …state our sins clearly and briefly without rambling;
6) …confess all mortal sins in number and kind;
7) …listen carefully to the advice the priest gives;
8) …confess our own sins and not someone else’s;
9) …carefully listen to and remember the penance and be sure to understand it;
10) …use a regular formula for confession so that it is familiar and comfortable;
11) …never be afraid to say something “embarrassing”… just say it;
12) …never worry that the priest thinks we are jerks…. he is usually impressed by our courage;
13) …never fear that the priest will not keep our confession secret… he is bound by the Seal;
14) …never confess “tendencies” or “struggles”… just sins;
15) …never leave the confessional before the priest has finished giving absolution;
16) …memorize an Act of Contrition;
17) …answer the priest’s questions briefly if he asks for a clarification;
18) …ask questions if we can’t understand what he means when he tells us something;
19) …keep in mind that sometimes priests can have bad days just as we do;
20) …remember that priests must go to confession too … they know what we are going through.

stjos/stvdp: 07.13.2014 - 03



HOMILY
Vigil Service
St. Joseph Church, Girardville PA
07 July 2014

Rev. Msgr. William F. Glosser, VF
Pastor, St. Clare of Assisi Parish
St. Clair PA
Dean of Schuylkill County

Last evening I was invited to the home of parishioners for dinner. In the course of the evening I was asked the question: “Why did you become a priest?”

Every priest has his own vocation story. To the disappointment of the inquisitor most vocation stories are not that thrilling. There are no Moses or Noah moments of God calling.

What some priests might say when pressed by inquiring minds to know is that, while they are committed to their priesthood and love their priesthood, it is not the vision of ministry they dreamed of in the seminary or even the first or second year after ordination. The challenges encountered serving the Lord can be unexpected and at times disappointing.

The priestly years of Fr. Thomas Horan who sadly experienced one serious stroke after another truly were challenging to our beloved “Vicar”; but one would never know it! When he would enter a sacristy to celebrate or concelebrate the Holy Mass, the response to one’s question “How are you Vicar?” was always, “Fine & Dandy!” Many a Mass I watched him in awe as he wrapped the fingers of his bad hand around the ciborium and with his eyes focused on mission he distributed the Body of Christ to the faithful. After he was retired, he volunteered in St. Joseph’s Hospital in Reading visiting the sick. He wasn’t ready for retirement and he still desired to perform priestly ministry. He wheeled himself in a wheelchair up and down the halls going room to room.

All the Vicar ever dreamed of doing was to serve Jesus Christ as His priestly servant, and he valiantly bore the cross of infirmity. His “fightin’ Irish” demeanor on more than one occasion quieted a chancery official who, out of concern for his physical health, “threatened” his active ministry. His Irish determination and his faith in the call to the priesthood of Jesus Christ overcame his physical limitations.

The poster of the Vicar that Tim Sullivan displayed near the casket reminds me of the Barry Fitzgerald character of Father Fitzgibbon in the Bing Crosby movie Going My Way. The Irish-born Fitzgibbon’s priesthood is challenged by the unconventional style of Fr. Chuck O’Malley. While Fr. Fitzgibbon thinks the Bishop sent Fr. O’Malley to be his curate, in essence O’Malley was sent to administer the affairs of St. Dominic’s parish. In the end Priestly Fraternity and Priestly Charity bring Fr. Fitzgibbon and Fr. O’Malley together to live as brother priests, share challenging ministry together, and become friends.

stjos/stvdp: 07.13.2014 - 04


As a newly ordained priest assigned to St. Canicus Parish in Mahanoy City, I met the Vicar in 1984. At the invitation of my pastor, Msgr. Francis Xavier Barrett, Fr. Horan dined at our table twice weekly. On Saturday evenings, Fr. Horan would reciprocate by inviting us over to Holy Rosary in “The Foot”. He and Msgr. Barrett would sip their Christian Brothers brandy from the Vicar’s prize Waterford crystal and regale me with stories of their trips to Ireland, their seminary days, and the way the Church really should be.

No matter how different from what I dreamt priesthood to be from actual ministry, they taught me some very valuable lessons about priestly fraternity and priestly charity. I learned that, no matter what, a priest is always welcome in the rectory at any time. I learned that the dreams of priesthood really do come to fruition when one is grounded in prayer and keeps one’s eyes fixed on the Lord. I learned there is always a place at table for another priest at dinner time. I learned wisdom by quietly and patiently listening to the stories of older priests even when they seemed at the time irrelevant to me.

Fr. Horan taught me a few other things about priesthood especially as his health declined. His sense of humility to allow others to vest him so he could celebrate the Sacred Mysteries – his greatest love in life. And I watched others respect and preserve his dignity in the loving way they honored their priest. I mentioned earlier Fr. Horan’s “fightin’ Irish” demeanor and his Irish determination in the way he carried his crosses in life; but I wish to conclude with his raw determination to love and serve Jesus Christ regardless of the challenges. His witness to this priestly calling, his Irish wit and demeanor, and his humility in allowing others to care for him teach us what a good priest is. Pope Francis says that a good shepherd needs to smell like his sheep. The Vicar bore the odor of sanctity of the Lord while his eyes bore the twinkle of Girardville. Priests need to love their people. People need to once again love their priests. Priests need to watch out for their brother priests.

Reflecting back some thirty years ago, perhaps I got a little bored hearing two older priests reminisce over a glass of Christian Brothers brandy, but thirty years later I reflect upon the tremendous witness of a real life Fr. Fitzgibbon and Fr. O’Malley in priestly fraternity and charity. The Vicar made me a better priest and I never knew till now. Fr. O’Malley at Fr. Fitzgibbon’s greatest moment of despair sang to him the Irish lullaby Too-ra-loo-ra-loo-ra”. It allowed Fitzgibbon to keep the dream alive. Whatever dream of priesthood the Vicar had in real life ministry he lived it well.

That is because Fr. Horan’s “adsum” on ordination day was only to serve the Lord and to bear his cross so to wear the crown Christ wore.

Well done good and faithful servant of God! Rest in the heavenly courts and celebrate well in the heavenly banquet.

stjos/stvdp: 07.13.2014 - 05


GOD ALWAYS WINS!
This past week, I had a welcome visit from a friend of mine whom I had not seen in many years. I knew him “way back when”, i.e. way back when he was an altar boy in a parish in which I was a resident priest.
When he graduated from college, he applied to the Diocese of Allentown for a job as an elementary school teacher. He was hired, and he stayed with the Diocese for twelve years. Then he transferred to public school. He has completed twenty-four years in the public schools, for a total of thirty-six years as an elementary-school teacher.
He told me this story: One day, in his fourth-grade public elementary school class, he told the children to stand up and form a line when the lunch bell rang. His duty was to shepherd them to the cafeteria. Once the children were lined up, he blessed himself and started to say Grace Before Meals. “In the Name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit. Bless us, O Lord …..”
Then he caught himself!
With a sheepish smile, he semi-apologized and said to the children, “Sorry about that! You know what? I forgot where I was. You see, I used to teach in Catholic school and we always said Grace Before Meals before we went to lunch.”
One of the children said, “Well, is it okay if we say Grace Before Meals anyway?” He said, “Sure, if you want to!” So, a little girl blessed herself and led the other children in Grace Before Meals. None of the other children voiced any objection!
I laughed when he told me that story. I said, “You’re lucky you weren’t hauled up on the carpet and fired!” He said, “Well, the law doesn’t permit a teacher to initiate a prayer, but if the children insist on praying, there’s nothing I can do about it!”
Moral of the story: All is not lost! If the government shuts the door on God, He manages to get in through the cracks. God always wins. He lives in the hearts of the people, especially in the hearts of the children and of those adults who are willing to become like children.
HAVE YOU HAD ANY DIFFICULTY HEARING THE READINGS AND THE HOMILY while attending Mass in St. Joseph Church?
If so, please know that the speakers have been inoperative ….. and I really don’t know for how long they have been inoperative.
Here’s the story: There are eight speakers that face out towards the congregation. There are two that face towards the sanctuary. The former have not been working, but the latter have been working. Inasmuch as the priest tunes in only to the two speakers that feed the sanctuary, I have to admit that I had not been aware of the fact that the eight other speakers were not working.
A couple of months ago, Ian informed me that they were not working.
I said, “Well, let’s do something! Sound is important! For all I know, none of the readings or homilies in the upper church have been heard since God knows when and I didn’t even know it!” I suggested that Ian contact John Karavage. I knew that John is an expert on audio. Ian did so and John checked out the amplifiers that feed the speakers and recommended that we contact Albert Marquardt. (I didn’t know that Albert was also an expert on audio.) So, we did. Albert diagnosed the problem and said that he would have to order parts from China. (No joke!) So, when the parts finally arrived on that proverbial slow boat from China, Albert was able to repair the amplifiers, after which Ian and he reinstalled them.
Fortunately, they were able to complete this job in time for Fr. Horan’s vigil service and funeral Mass.

stjos/stvdp: 07.13.2014 - 06


Q. — IS IT TRUE THAT GOD IS PRESENT EVERYWHERE?
A. — YES!
Q. — BUT IS IT TRUE THAT GOD IS MORE PRESENT IN SOME VENUES THAN HE IS IN OTHERS?
A. — YES!
Q. — I DON’T GET IT! TO ME, “PRESENT” IS “PRESENT”. EITHER YOU’RE PRESENT OR YOU’RE ABSENT! I DON’T SEE HOW SOMEONE CAN BE MORE OR LESS PRESENT!
A. — OKAY, LET’S THINK ABOUT IT!
I had a conversation this past week with a friend of mine who is distressed that her adult daughter has lost — at least it seems has lost — her Catholic Faith.
(I was tempted to say, “Welcome to the Club! You’re not alone!)
My friend implored her daughter to go back to Mass or, at the very least, to stop into a church and kneel or sit before the Tabernacle and “let God’s Holy Spirit work in your life”.
The daughter retorted that God is everywhere, so what is the point of going to church to “visit God”? If He is present everywhere, then how can He be more present in the Tabernacle?
So, that is the question: If it is true that God is everywhere, then why should we make a big deal out of saying that God is in the Tabernacle, i.e. in the Holy Eucharist? Can God be more present in one venue than in another?
Actually, the answer is “Yes”.
Think of it this way.
In the Old Testament, God insisted that Solomon build Him a house in which He could dwell. He was quite insistent on this. So, Solomon built the Temple. In the center of the Temple was the Holy of Holies. In the Holy of Holies, there was the Ark of the Covenant. God decreed that He should be accessible to the priests and the people on the “Mercy Seat”, which was known in Hebrew as the “kapporeth” and in Greek as the “hilasterion”. It was the lid of the Ark of the Covenant underneath the wings of the cherubim.
In other words, although God continued to be present everywhere, He decreed that He should be actively engaged in bestowing Mercy whenever worship was directed towards Him on the Mercy Seat.
In the New Testament era, God has decided to make Himself present to His people in a visible, tangible way — much more visible and tangible than in the Ark of the Covenant.
He became flesh of the Virgin Mary and was made Man!
Jesus is the new Temple. Jesus is the new Mercy Seat.
Imagine yourself living in Bethlehem at the time of the Birth of Jesus Christ. Imagine being told by angels that the newborn King could be found wrapped in swaddling clothes and lying in a manger? Then ask yourself: Would you say to yourself, “What’s the point of my going to the manger? God is everywhere! He might be in the manger, but big whoop! I think I’ll just sit on my front porch and worship God in nature.”? Do you think that that is what you would have done?
If so, then I really don’t have any more to say to you.
But if you do see the difference between these two modes of God’s presence, then continue reading.
        GOD HAS BECOME FLESH! GOD HAS BECOME FLESH! GOD HAS BECOME FLESH!
All seven sacraments are based on the premise that GOD HAS BECOME FLESH!
And, pre-eminent among the seven sacraments is the Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist.
The Holy Eucharist is THE BODY AND THE BLOOD, THE SOUL AND THE DIVINITY OF JESUS CHRIST UNDER THE APPEARANCES OF BREAD AND WINE.
THE HOLY EUCHARIST IS THE MERCY SEAT!

We eat the Body and drink the Blood of the Lord.
We visit the Lord in the Tabernacle.
THE TABERNACLE IS THE ARK OF THE COVENANT ENCLOSING THE MERCY SEAT!
Let me try one more example having to do with “degrees of presence”.
When a man and a woman get married, they agree to communicate with one another, do they not? They agree to be present to one another, do they not? But what kind of presence do they agree to? Do they agree to text one another or to telephone one another? Do they agree to chat with one another while sitting in their living room? Probably “yes” to all of these. But do they not seek out a deeper presence, a deeper communication with one another? And is not this deeper presence, this deeper communication something quite tangible and physical and specific? Is it not a spousal presence? Is this spousal presence nothing greater than the presence that comes with texting and telephoning and chatting in the living room?
You do see what I mean, do you not?

stjos/stvdp: 07.13.2014 - 07


LABOR DAY RAFFLE
BENEFIT OF SAINT JOSEPH PARISH

We will be chancing off $100.00 worth of Redner’s gift cards plus $100.00 worth of Boyer’s gift cards in the Sheridan Room on Monday, 01 September, after the 10:00 am Mass in St. Joseph Chapel.
Chances are $2.00 each / 3 for $5.00.
Chances will be sold after each of the weekend Masses at St. Joseph’s between now and Labor Day and also on Saturday, 16 August, on “Pioneer Day” in Ashland.
Please support this fundraiser!

 

• Did you know that clams and lobsters and oysters and shrimp and crabs can’t go to Heaven?
• No! I did not know that!
• Do you know why they can’t go to Heaven?
• No, I do not know why. Pray, tell me!
• Because they’re shellfish!
And the moral of the story is: Be generous to the Bishop’s Annual Appeal. Don’t be shellfish!

stjos/stvdp: 07.13.2014 - 08


 

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