MASS SCHEDULE: 20 - 27 October
SAINT
JOSEPH CHURCH
GIRARDVILLE

Saturday, 19 October
Vigil of Sunday
05:30 pm — God’s blessings and safety:
Rev. CHRISTOPHER S. BUTERA
by Mom and Dad and family

Sunday, 20 October
29th Sunday in Ordinary Time
11:30 am — JOSEPH RIZZARDI Sr.
by the Rizzardi family

Monday, 21 October
Weekday
08:00 am — SPECIAL INTENTION: health of grandchild
rescheduled from 23 Sept

Wednesday, 23 October
St. John of Capistrano, priest (OptMem)
08:00 am — God’s blessings on SUSAN THYE
by her daughter, Carolyn

Friday, 25 October
Weekday
08:00 am — GARY J. GILBERT
by Alfred and Anne Zielinski

Saturday, 26 October
Weekday
08:00 am — Rev. KEVIN L. KAYDA
by EBC
Vigil of Sunday
05:30 pm — TOMEE LEIGH GOWER
(26th anniversary of birth)
by her family

Sunday, 27 October
30th Sunday in Ordinary Time
10:00 am — God’s blessings and health: HENRY WAYNE
by a friend
11:30 am — God’s blessings on STEPHEN and JOANI GONTIS
by Jim and Eva Gontis

 MASS SCHEDULE: 20 - 27 October
SAINT
VINCENT dePAUL CHURCH
GIRARDVILLE 
     

Saturday, 19 October
Vigil of Sunday
04:00 pm — THOMAS and THOMASINE BISCOE
by Bernice Yackera

Sunday, 20 October
29th Sunday in Ordinary Time
08:30 am — PETER F. SHERMAN
by Charles and Kathleen

Tuesday, 22 October
Bl. John Paul II, pope (OptMem)
08:00 am — JEAN STATUTIS MAJIKAS
by Jean Birster Weist

Thursday, 24 October
St. Anthony Mary Claret, bishop (OptMem)
07:00 pm — SPECIAL INTENTION
by Mary Draugelis Miller

Saturday, 26 October
Vigil of Sunday
04:00 pm — ELINORE BUDNAVAGE
by Michael and Margaret Yesalavage and family

Sunday, 27 October
30th Sunday in Ordinary Time
08:30 am — JOSEPH MISUNAS
by James and Georgann Connell

stjos/stvdp: 10.20.2013 - 01


COLLECTION TOTALS FROM LAST WEEKEND:
12 / 13 OCTOBER


Saint Joseph Parish
:
Receipts for parish purposes: $1,013.00 from the Sunday envelopes; $40.00 from the plate; $50.00 from the Dues envelopes; $141.00 from the Building maintenance envelopes; $353.00 from the Fuel envelopes; $56.00 from the loose.
Total: $1,653.00
Receipts for non-parish purposes: — 0 —
Analysis: When one deducts from the total of the receipts for parish purposes ($1,653.00) our weekly financial obligation to the Diocese, i.e. assessments ($269.31), plus our weekly premium for various insurances ($491.15), plus our weekly subsidy to Trinity Academy ($358.17), the sum total of which is $1,118.63, one sees that $534.37 is available from this collection for operating the parish.

Saint Vincent dePaul Parish:
Receipts for parish purposes:

$842.00 from the Sunday envelopes; $61.00 from the plate; $22.00 from the Dues envelopes; $109.00 from the Building maintenance envelopes; $327.00 from the Fuel envelopes; $71.00 from the loose.
Total: $1,432.00
Receipts for non-parish purposes: — 0 —
Analysis: When one deducts from the total of the receipts for parish purposes ($1,432.00) our weekly financial obligation to the Diocese, i.e. assessments ($231.00), plus our weekly premium for various insurances ($322.56), plus our weekly subsidy to Trinity Academy ($250.98), the sum total of which is $804.54, one sees that $627.46 is available from this collection for operating the parish.

CONFESSION SCHEDULE THIS WEEK

Wednesday, 23 October
02:30 to 03:30 pm
St. Vincent dePaul Church

Thursday, 24 October
06:00 to 07:00 pm
St. Vincent dePaul Church

Friday, 25 October
06:30 to 07:30 pm
St. Joseph Chapel

EXPOSITION OF THE BLESSED SACRAMENT

Wednesday, 23 October
02:00 to 04:00 pm
St. Vincent dePaul Church
Scripture Rosary at about 03:40 pm
followed by Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament

Friday, 25 October
06:00 to 08:00 pm
St. Joseph Chapel
Vespers (Evening Prayer) at about 07:30 pm
followed by Chaplet of Divine Mercy


ALWAYS REMEMBER: NO MATTER HOW FAR YOU PUSH THE ENVELOPE, IT WILL ALWAYS BE STATIONERY!

stjos/stvdp: 10.20.2013 - 02


 
THIS HOT OFF THE WIRES!!!
THE WASHINGTON REDSKINS
(pro football team) are changing their name.
Reason: There is a great deal of hatred, hostility and anger associated with that name.
So, from now on, the team will be known simply as
THE REDSKINS.

 CONFIRMANDI!
(That’s the fancy word for persons who are on deck to receive the Sacrament of Confirmation.
Persons who have already received the Sacrament of Confirmation are known as “CONFIRMATI”.)
The four children from our parishes who are going to be confirmed on Tuesday, 26 November, will please meet with Father Connolly on Wednesday, 23 October,
at 07:00 pm
in St. Vincent dePaul Rectory.
It would be good if at least one parent of each child would also be present. But the children should be present, even if the parents are not able to come.

stjos/stvdp: 10.20.2013 - 03



STRUGGLING TO UNDERSTAND SUICIDE

Preface: This article was written by Father Ronald Rolheiser, OMI. It was inserted inside the program for the Mass of Christian Burial of a young man who died recently, having taken his own life. Although I did not know this young man personally, I am “connected” to him in more than one way, one of which is the fact that he and I are alumni of the same school (although many years apart). I am including this article in the bulletin because I know that there are a few persons in our parishes who have experienced the death of a family member by suicide. What Fr. Rolheiser has to say in this article is good and true and helpful.
Although, as Catholics, we do not and cannot waver from the assertion that, objectively speaking, suicide is a grievously wrong action, we must, nevertheless, assert that, in almost all cases, the person who takes his own life is not doing so “with full knowledge and full consent of the will”. If such be the case, then the person has not placed himself beyond the reach of God’s mercy. If you have a family member who has committed suicide, I encourage you to entrust him or her to God’s mercy and to keep him or her in your prayers. It is no part of the heavenly Father’s plan that a single one of His little ones should ever come to grief.
Sadly, today, there are many deaths by suicide. Very few people have not been deeply affected by the suicide of a loved one. In the United States alone, there are more than thirty-three thousand suicides a year. That averages out to ninety such deaths per day, about three to four every hour.
And yet suicide remains widely misunderstood and generally leaves those who are left behind with a particularly devastating kind of grief. Among all deaths, suicide perhaps weighs heaviest on those left behind. Why?
Suicide hits us so hard because it is surrounded with the ultimate taboo. In the popular mind, suicide is generally seen, consciously or unconsciously, as the ultimate act of despair, the ultimate bad thing a person can do. This shouldn't surprise us since suicide does go against the deepest instinct inside us, our will to live. Thus, even when it's treated with understanding and compassion, it still leaves those left behind with a certain amount of shame and a lot of second-guessing. Also, more often than not, it ruins the memory of the person who died. His photographs slowly disappear from our walls and the manner of his death is spoken about with an all-too-hushed discretion. None of this should be surprising: Suicide is the ultimate taboo.
So what's to be said about suicide? How can we move towards understanding it more empathically?
Understanding suicide more compassionately won't take away its sting, nothing will, except time; but our own long-term healing and the redemption of the memory of the one died can be helped by keeping a number of things in mind.
Suicide, in most cases, is a disease, not something freely willed. The person who dies in this way dies against his or her will, akin to those who jumped to their deaths from the Twin Towers after terrorist planes had set those buildings on fire on September 11, 2001. They were jumping to certain death, but only because they were already burning to death where they were standing. Death by suicide is analogous to death by cancer, stroke, or heart attack; except, in the case of suicide, it's a question of emotional-cancer, emotional-stroke, or an emotional-heart attack.

stjos/stvdp: 10.20.2013 - 04


Moreover, still to be more fully explored, is the potential role that biochemistry plays in suicide. Since some suicidal depressions are treatable by drugs, clearly then some suicides are caused by biochemical deficiencies, as are many other diseases that kill us.
The person who dies in this way, almost invariably, is a very sensitive human being. Suicide is rarely done in arrogance, as an act of contempt. There are of course examples of persons, like Hitler, who are too proud to endure normal human contingency and kill themselves out of arrogance, but that's a very different kind of suicide, not the kind that most of us have seen in a loved one. Generally our own experience with the loved ones that we've lost to suicide was that these persons were anything but arrogant. More accurately described, they were too bruised to touch and were wounded in some deep way that we couldn't comprehend or help heal. Indeed, often times when sufficient time has passed after their deaths, in retrospect, we get some sense of their wound, one which we never clearly perceived while they were alive. Their suicide then no longer seems as surprising.
Finally, we need not worry unduly about the eternal salvation of those who die in this way. God's understanding and compassion infinitely surpass our own. Our lost loved ones are in safer hands than ours. If we, limited as we are, can already reach through this tragedy with some understanding and love, we can rest secure in the fact that, given the width and depth of God's love, the one who dies through suicide meets, on the other side, a compassion that's deeper than our own and a judgment that intuits the deepest motives of their heart.
Moreover, God's love, as we are assured of in our scriptures and as is manifest in Jesus' resurrection, is not as helpless as our own in dealing with this. We, in dealing with our loved ones, sometimes find ourselves helpless, without a strategy and without energy, standing outside an oak-like door, shutout because of someone's fear, wound, sickness, or loneliness. Most persons who die by suicide are precisely locked inside this kind of private room by some cancerous wound through which we cannot reach and through which they themselves cannot reach. Our best efforts leave us still unable to penetrate that private hell. But, as we see in the resurrection appearances of Jesus, God's love and compassion are not rendered helpless by locked doors. God's love doesn't stand outside, helplessly knocking. Rather it goes right through the locked doors, stands inside the huddle of fear and loneliness, and breathes out peace. So too for our loved ones who die by suicide. We find ourselves helpless, but God can, and does, go through those locked doors and, once there, breathes out peace inside a tortured, huddled heart.

stjos/stvdp: 10.20.2013 - 05


PEOPLE HAVE BEEN ASKING ME when the former IHM School building will be demolished. The best I can tell anyone is that the contract has been signed by the contractor and by me. We are awaiting word from the contractor as to when he will be able to proceed. We shall certainly let everyone know when the contractor sets a date. I had anticipated that the job would have been done in September. As we all come to realize in this life: Human beings anticipate and God laughs. Everything takes longer than anticipated.
WELCOME TO GIRARDVILLE!
We were all sad when the McDonald Funeral Home closed. The McDonald family had a long and proud tradition of providing service to the people of Girardville and vicinity. The only member of the family with whom I had had personal acquaintance and professional interchange was “young Bill McDonald” (or “Billy” as most people call him). I always thought that he was a fine funeral director, skillful at his trade and always kind and courteous. I join everyone else in Girardville in wishing Billy all the best at this time of transition in his life.
Now, we welcome the Sullivan family to Girardville!
Thomas M. Sullivan,
who operates a funeral parlor in Frackville, has purchased the former McDonald Funeral Home and is now prepared to offer his services to families in their time of need. Mr. Sullivan has five children, the youngest of whom, Timothy, has followed in his father’s footsteps. So, we anticipate that people in our town who require the services of a funeral director and who choose Sullivan’s will be dealing mostly with Timothy M. Sullivan, the supervisor of the Girardville facility.
Neither the parishes nor I ever “endorse” any particular funeral director. We maintain a posture of neutrality. Our parishes deal with all funeral directors equally. But we cannot refrain from saying that we are happy that “an empty spot” has been filled on West Main Street.
Both Tom and Tim assure me that they would be the last persons in the world to look down on any resident of Girardville. (Old joke, but couldn’t resist.)
Reminder: Next Sunday (27 Oct) is the last Sunday of the month. Therefore, the 11:30 am Mass will be celebrated according to the “extraordinary form”. As is our custom on the last Sunday, there will be a Mass (“ordinary form”) at 10:00 am in the chapel.
MONTHLY PRAYER MEETING FOR MEN
Are there any men in our parishes who would be interested in getting together once a month for prayer, spiritual conversation and mutual support? If so, please let Fr. Connolly know.
IF OUR PARISHES WERE TO RECEIVE SIX PERCENT (6%) of all the money that our parishioners spend on supermarket purchases, what a difference this would make to our financial well-being!
But that’s not a mere pipe dream, you know. Two of our local supermarkets make it possible.
Redner’s and Boyer’s sell gift cards to the parishes at a five percent (5%) discount. We resell them at face value. All you have to do is purchase them, either in the back of the church after Mass or else at the Rectory. And, in addition, the parishes can earn an extra one percent (1%) when people use the Redner’s or Boyer’s key cards. These key cards can simply be shown to the cashier when you make your purchase. If you don’t already have one, ask “the lady (or gentleman) in the back of the church” to give you one.

stjos/stvdp: 10.20.2013 - 06



WALTER MICHAEL TRUSCOTT III,
son of Walter M. Truscott II (deceased) and Grace F. (Nettles) Truscott,
and
RENÉE ROSE GALLE,
daughter of Vito A. and Virginia S. (Sanko) Galle,
became husband and wife on Saturday, 20 October, at a Nuptial Mass celebrated at 01:00 pm in St. Joseph Church.

They answered “Yes” to each of the three questions that preceded their vows:

“Have you come here freely and without reservation to give yourselves to each other in marriage?”
“Will you love and honor each other as man and wife for the rest of your lives?”
“Will you accept children lovingly from God and bring them up according to the law of Christ and His Church?”

As taught by St. Augustine of Hippo, Christian marriage is founded on “the sacred tripod” of PERMANENCE, FIDELITY and OPENNESS TO CHILDREN.
We congratulate Walter and Renée on their willingness to commit themselves to one another permanently, faithfully and with openness to childbearing.
They will need God’s grace to make this commitment a reality.
God will give them this grace because He is kind and merciful and never refuses His grace to those who ask Him.
May His perfect Will be accomplished in them.
May their love for one another grow stronger through the passing years!
Congratulations, Mr. and Mrs. Truscott!

stjos/stvdp: 10.20.2013 - 07



THIRTY REASONS WHY
A FAIR NUMBER OF MEN IN GIRARDVILLE
DON’T GO TO MASS

1) Mass is so damn boring!
2) The organist plays too loud!
3) I don’t know any of those people there!
4) I’ll miss the football game if I go.
5) I need to catch up on my sleep.
6) I’ll go someday when I get older.
7) I just feel that God doesn’t accept me.
8) The Mass is too long!
9) I don’t like to get dressed up.
10) The women are in charge!
11) The priest talks down to the people as if they’re a bunch of idiots!
12) The sermon is over my head.
13) You know, you don’t have to go to Mass to be a Christian!
14) Religion is a racket. The priest is always asking for money.
15) I feel creepy if I go. The people there know my background.
16) Church is for the ladies!
17) I’m really just too busy to go.
18) The priest is a pain in the butt. He’s always yelling about something.
19) I work sixty hours a week. I need a break.
20) I don’t need church. I already live a good life.
21) The priest there doesn’t like me.
22) The priest is always talking about sex and politics!
23) Those people at Mass are just a bunch of hypocrites!
24) A little religion is okay once in a while, but I’m not a fanatic.
25) Christmas and Easter: that’s enough for me.
26) My Dad didn’t go to Mass!
27) That priest is always condemning people in his sermon.
28) The sermons don’t apply to me.
29) I like to have a few drinks on a Saturday night and, on Sunday, I’m hung over.
30) I plan to go to Mass once I clean up my act.
And now, ladies and gentlemen, let us tell you the real reason, the reason underlying all the pathetic excuses for reasons listed above. (Drum roll, please!)
31) THE DEVIL IS TELLING THEM NOT TO GO BECAUSE HE WANTS TO GET AS MANY OF THEM AS HE POSSIBLY CAN TO JOIN HIM IN HELL FOR ALL ETERNITY. ……… AND IF YOU THINK THAT’S A JOKE, YOU ARE SADLY MISTAKEN.

stjos/stvdp: 10.20.2013 - 08


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