MASS SCHEDULE: 10 - 17 JUNE
SAINT
JOSEPH CHURCH
GIRARDVILLE

Saturday, 09 June
Vigil of Corpus Christi
05:30 pm — ROSEANN NEISS DEVINE
by her husband, Dennis

Sunday, 10 June
Corpus Christi
11:30 am — AGNES CONNOR
by her daughter, Anna

Monday, 11 June
St. Barnabas, apostle (OblMem)
08:00 am — Health and God’s blessings: HENRY WAYNE
by Eileen and sons

Tuesday, 12 June
Weekday
07:00 pm — — DAN WOZNISKY
by OPM

Wednesday, 13 June
St. Anthony of Padua, priest, doctor (OblMem)
08:00 am — Deceased: YACKENCHICK and MERCURI FAMILIES
by Albert J. Yackenchick Jr.

Thursday, 14 June
Weekday
08:00 am — RUSSELL WEIST
by his wife, Jean

Friday, 15 June
The Most Sacred Heart of Jesus (Sol)
08:00 am — Living and Deceased: WILLIAM DeLUCA FAMILY
by Celeste

Saturday, 16 June
The Immaculate Heart of the Blessed Virgin Mary (OblMem)
08:00 am — Health and God’s Blessings: SISTER MARY RAYMOND, OP
by her sister, Carolyn
Vigil of Sunday
05:30 pm — ALICE [“Betty”] MULLIGAN
by Virginia Correa Chillis

Sunday, 17 June
11th Sunday in Ordinary Time
11:30 am — ROSEANN NEISS DEVINE
by her husband, Dennis

 MASS SCHEDULE: 10 - 17 JUNE
SAINT
Vincent dePAUL CHURCH
GIRARDVILLE 
     

Saturday, 09 June
Vigil of Corpus Christi
04:00 pm — Deceased: YESAITIS and STATUTIS FAMILIES)
by Jean Statutis Majikas and family

Sunday, 10 June
Corpus Christi
08:30 am — Deceased: HOLY NAME SOCIETY
by the HNS

Monday, 11 June
St. Barnabas, apostle (OblMem)
07:00 pm — ELIZABETH MOKRITSKY
by OPM

Tuesday, 12 June
Weekday
08:00 am — Health and God’s blessings: SAMUEL JUDE GONTIS
by his parents, Jim and Eva

Wednesday, 13 June
St. Anthony of Padua, priest, doctor (OblMem)
07:00 pm — FRANCIS J. and ESTELLE PURCELL
by their sons: Jimmy, Francis and Brian

Thursday, 14 June
Weekday
07:00 pm — In Thanksgiving to SAINT ANTHONY
by Rose D’Alfonso Popeck

Friday, 15 June
The Most Sacred Heart of Jesus (Sol)
05:00 pm — BLASÉ J. DRAUGELIS
by Anna Smela

Saturday, 16 June
Vigil of Sunday
04:00 pm — HARRY LUSCAVAGE
by John and Barbara Petrousky and family

Sunday, 17 June
11th Sunday in Ordinary Time
08:30 am — MARY FORTE LaSELVA
by Frank and Rose Popeck

stjos/stvdp: 06.10.2012 - 01


COLLECTION TOTALS FROM LAST WEEKEND:
02 / 03 June


Saint Joseph Parish
:
Receipts for parish purposes: $1,039.00 from the Sunday envelopes; $57.00 from the second collection (plate); $238.00 from the Dues envelopes; $62.50 from the loose.
Total: $1,396.50
Receipts for non-parish purposes: — 0 —
Analysis: When one deducts from the total of the receipts for parish purposes ($1,396.50) our weekly financial obligation to the Diocese, i.e. assessments ($329.54), plus our weekly premium for property and casualty insurance ($464.00), plus our weekly subsidy to Trinity Academy ($358.17), the sum total of which is $1,151.17, one sees that $245.33 is available from this collection for operating the parish.

Saint Vincent DePaul Parish:
Receipts for parish purposes: $1,062.00 from the Sunday envelopes; $48.00 from the second collection (plate); $223.00 from the Dues envelopes; $5.00 from the Building maintenance envelopes; $84.00 from the Ascension envelopes; $103.00 from the loose.
Total: $1,525.00
Receipts for non-parish purposes: — 0 —
Analysis: When one deducts from the total of the receipts for parish purposes ($1,525.00) our weekly financial obligation to the Diocese, i.e. assessments ($229.38), plus our weekly premium for property and casualty insurance ($282.46), plus our weekly subsidy to Trinity Academy ($250.98), the sum total of which is $762.82, one sees that $762.18 is available from this collection for operating the parish.

CONFESSION SCHEDULE THIS WEEK

Wednesday, 13 June
02:30 to 03:30 pm
St. Vincent dePaul Church

Thursday, 14 June
06:00 to 07:00 pm
St. Vincent dePaul Church

Friday, 15 June
06:30 to 07:30 pm
St. Joseph Chapel

EXPOSITION OF THE BLESSED SACRAMENT

Wednesday, 13 June
02:00 to 04:00 pm
St. Vincent dePaul Church
Scripture Rosary at about 03:40 pm, followed by Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament

Friday, 15 June
06:00 to 08:00 pm
St. Joseph Chapel
Vespers at about 07:30 pm, followed by Chaplet of Divine Mercy,
concluding with Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament

PARENTS: Please be vigilant to see to it that your teenage daughters are dressed modestly, most especially when they attend Mass. For example, the wearing of short shorts in church is definitely a violation of the virtue of modesty. I would not be putting this into the bulletin if I did not have a particular reason!

stjos/stvdp: 06.10.2012 - 02


PROTECTORS OF UNBORN PRECIOUS SOULS is a Schuylkill County group that promotes PRO-LIFE awareness, activities and good deeds.
This group will meet at 06:00 pm on Tuesday, 12 June in St. Vincent dePaul Rectory.
I would like to encourage as many of our StJosPar and StVdPPar parishioners as possible to attend this meeting.
You are not making any particular commitment by attending. You will simply have an opportunity to learn about what this group is trying to accomplish. If you wish to join up, that’s fine. If not, there is nothing lost by attending.

BISHOP BARRES TO VISIT GIRARDVILLE!
Some time ago, I extended a general, non-specific invitation to Bishop Barres to come celebrate Mass at one or both of our parish churches on a day of his own choosing.
No particular reason! No agenda! I just thought that it would be good for him and good for our people if he were to celebrate the Eucharist with us and for us.
Time passed.
Then, this past week, I got a call from the Front Office.
I was told that Bishop Barres would like to celebrate the 08:30 am Mass (StVdP Church) and the 11:30 am Mass (StJos Church) on Sunday, 12 August.
Of course, I told them, “Wonderful! We’ll be happy to have the Bishop come to celebrate Mass!”
I was told by the Front Office that the Bishop does not want any reception or any meal. (I might offer him a cup of coffee between Masses!) This is a strictly “no pomp or ceremony” visit. No fuss, no feathers.
I anticipate that he will arrive shortly before 08:30 am and will leave right after the 11:30 am Mass.
Now, in order to squelch any rumors or any hints about “deep, underlying motives” for the visit, allow me to say loud and clear:
THIS VISIT IS NOTHING MORE AND NOTHING LESS THAN “THE CHIEF SHEPHERD VISITING HIS PEOPLE IN THE VILLE OF GIRARD IN ORDER TO SAY MASS FOR THEM”. IT HAS NOTHING WHATSOEVER TO DO WITH ANNOUNCEMENTS ABOUT ANYTHING THAT IS ABOUT TO TAKE PLACE NOR ABOUT ANY DECISIONS THAT HAVE BEEN MADE!!
However, I am realistic enough to know that CHICKEN LITTLE is going to tell DUCKY LUCKY that the SKY IS GOING TO FALL on 12 August 2012 and GOOSEY LOOSEY is going to tell me, “The Sky is going to fall on 12 August 2012”. Oh, well! What can I say? Been there! Done that!

I would appreciate it if someone would lock Chicken Little in the chicken coop until after 12 August.

stjos/stvdp:06.10.2012 - 03


INTERVIEW WITH BLESSED POPE JOHN PAUL II
ON THE SUBJECT OF HEAVEN

Your Holiness--or should I say, Your Beatitude?--thank you sharing your wisdom with us on this topic.
What does the Catholic Church teach about heaven?

When the form of this world has passed away, those who have welcomed God into their lives and have sincerely opened themselves to his love, at least at the moment of death, will enjoy that fullness of communion with God which is the goal of human life.
As the Catechism of the Catholic Church teaches:

"This perfect life with the Most Holy Trinity--this communion of life and love with the Trinity, with the Virgin Mary, the angels and all the blessed--is called 'heaven'. Heaven is the ultimate end and fulfillment of the deepest human longings, the state of supreme, definitive happiness" (CCC 1024).

There is a famous story of a Soviet cosmonaut getting up into space, looking around, and declaring that he didn't see God anywhere. This plays on the idea that heaven is "up" from us on the surface of the earth. Isn't this way of speaking found in the Bible? Should we understand it literally or metaphorically?
In biblical language "heaven", when it is joined to the "earth", indicates part of the universe. Scripture says about creation: "In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth" (Gn 1:1).
Metaphorically speaking, heaven is understood as the dwelling-place of God, who is thus distinguished from human beings (cf. Ps 104:2f.; 115:16; Is 66:1). He sees and judges from the heights of heaven (cf. Ps 113:4-9) and comes down when he is called upon (cf. Ps 18:9, 10; 144:5).
However the biblical metaphor makes it clear that God does not identify himself with heaven, nor can he be contained in it (cf. 1 Kgs 8:27); and this is true, even though in some passages of the First Book of the Maccabees "Heaven" is simply one of God's names (1Mc 3:18, 19, 50, 60; 4:24, 55).

People often ask if two Old Testament figures--Enoch and Elijah--ascended to heaven, given that Jesus had not yet "opened the gates of heaven." The word the Bible uses for where Elijah went is the usual Hebrew word for heaven--sh'mayim (2 Kings 2:1, 11). Does the Bible present them as going to heaven, as exceptions to the general rule, or as going somewhere else?
The depiction of heaven as the transcendent dwelling-place of the living God is joined with that of the place to which believers, through grace, can also ascend, as we see in the Old Testament accounts of Enoch (cf. Gn 5:24) and Elijah (cf. 2 Kgs 2:11).
Thus heaven becomes an image of life in God. In this sense Jesus speaks of a "reward in heaven" (Mt 5:12) and urges people to "lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven" (ibid., 6:20; cf. 19:21).

If the concept of heaven is already present in the Old Testament, does the New Testament add anything to our understanding of heaven?
The New Testament amplifies the idea of heaven in relation to the mystery of Christ.
To show that the Redeemer's sacrifice acquires perfect and definitive value, the Letter to the Hebrews says that Jesus "passed through the heavens" (Heb 4:14), and "entered, not into a sanctuary made with hands, a copy of the true one, but into heaven itself" (ibid., 9:24).
Since believers are loved in a special way by the Father, they are raised with Christ and made citizens of heaven.
It is worthwhile listening to what the Apostle Paul tells us about this in a very powerful text:
"God, who is rich in mercy, out of the great love with which he loved us, even when we were dead through our trespasses, made us alive together with Christ (by grace you have been saved), and raised us up with him, and made us sit with him in the heavenly places in Christ Jesus, that in the coming ages he might show the immeasurable riches of his grace in kindness toward us in Christ Jesus" (Eph 2:4-7).

The fatherhood of God, who is rich in mercy, is experienced by creatures through the love of God's crucified and risen Son, who sits in heaven on the right hand of the Father as Lord.

Alright. This passage speaks of us as seated with Christ in heaven now--of our present citizenship in heaven. But surely there is more to come, at the end of our lives or at the end of the time--whichever comes first. Right?
After the course of our earthly life, participation in complete intimacy with the Father . . . comes through our insertion into Christ's paschal mystery.
St Paul emphasizes our meeting with Christ in heaven at the end of time with a vivid spatial image:
"Then we who are alive, who are left, shall be caught up together with them in the clouds to meet the Lord in the air; and so we shall always be with the Lord. Therefore comfort one another with these words" (1Thes 4:17-18).

Many people are very curious about the nature of heaven. For example, will it really be a physical place in the clouds, the way it is often pictured. In the past, some have even proposed detailed descriptions of heaven and what it will be like. How should we regard these descriptions?
In the context of revelation, we know that the "heaven" or "happiness" in which we will find ourselves is neither an abstraction nor a physical place in the clouds, but a living, personal relationship with the Holy Trinity.
It is our meeting with the Father which takes place in the risen Christ through the communion of the Holy Spirit.
It is always necessary to maintain a certain restraint in describing these "ultimate realities" since their depiction is always unsatisfactory.
Today, personalist language is better suited to describing the state of happiness and peace we will enjoy in our definitive communion with God.
The Catechism of the Catholic Church sums up the Church's teaching on this truth:

"By his death and Resurrection, Jesus Christ has 'opened' heaven to us. The life of the blessed consists in the full and perfect possession of the fruits of the redemption accomplished by Christ. He makes partners in his heavenly glorification those who have believed in him and remained faithful to his will. Heaven is the blessed community of all who are perfectly incorporated into Christ" (n. 1026).

Finally, Your Holiness, sometimes people speak of "heaven on earth," meaning an event, place, or time that seems to foreshadow heaven in some way. Are there things like that in this life or is it just a figure of speech?
[Heaven] can be anticipated in some way today in sacramental life, whose center is the Eucharist, and in the gift of self through fraternal charity.
If we are able to enjoy properly the good things that the Lord showers upon us every day, we will already have begun to experience that joy and peace which one day will be completely ours.
We know that on this earth everything is subject to limits, but the thought of the "ultimate" [last] realities helps us to live better the "penultimate" [next-to-last] realities.
We know that as we pass through this world we are called to seek "the things that are above, where Christ is seated at the right hand of God" (Col3:1), in order to be with him in the eschatological [i.e., end-of-the-world final] fulfillment, when the Spirit will fully reconcile with the Father "all things, whether on earth or in heaven" (Col 1:20).
Thank you, Your Holiness.

Note: The answers in this “interview” are authentic statements of Blessed Pope John Paul II. The placing of these statements in the form of an interview format is a literary device constructed by apologist Jimmy Akin.

stjos/stvdp: 06.10.2012 - 04 / 05


“I see no hope for the future of our people if they are dependent on the frivolous youth of today, for certainly all youth are reckless beyond words. When I was a boy, we were taught to be discreet and respectful of elders, but the present youth are exceedingly wise and impatient of restraint.”
                                                                                                                    Hesiod (7th century BC Greek poet

A FEW THOUGHTS PROMPTED BY THIS OBSERVATION FROM HESIOD
NOT LONG AGO, I was driving west on Mahanoy Avenue and was about to turn left onto 2nd Street. I was wearing a cassock because I was going over to St. Joseph Church for Mass.
I saw two boys standing in the middle of the street. They looked to be about 15 years old, give or take a year. I didn’t recognize them. They were holding collection cans. It occurred to me that they were collecting for some charity or community-service organization. My presumption was correct. They were collecting for their baseball team. I am all in favor of boys playing baseball. It is a wholesome activity and one that I am happy to support. I stopped the car when I got to the intersection and rolled down the window. One of the boys came over to me. I reached into my wallet and took out a few dollars. I put it into his collection can. He said, “Thanks, buddy!” I said nothing. Normally, when someone says, “thanks”, I say, “you’re welcome”. But this time I didn’t say “you’re welcome”. I didn’t say anything. I just rolled up the window and proceeded to make my turn. I thought to myself: “Why did he call me “buddy”? I’m about 60 years older than he is.” I didn’t mind that he didn’t address me as “Father” or “Pastor” or even as “Reverend”. Those titles of address might not be in his vocabulary. But certainly “Mister” or “Sir” should be in his vocabulary. I would have settled for either. In fact, I would have settled for a simple “Thank you!” with no title whatsoever. But for a kid to call an adult “buddy”, especially an adult whom he does not even know is unacceptable.
When I was 15 years old, I got a job as a behind-the-counter clerk in a rather large neighborhood store. The store was part of a chain known as Sun Ray. The store stocked a wide variety of merchandise. The manager of the store trained me in how to deal with what she called “the trade”. She emphasized that I should address the customers as “Sir” and “Ma’am”. She told me that I should greet people with “How may I help you, Sir?” or “How may I help you, Ma’am (or Miss)?” I remember that the manager would often compliment me on my good manners. This made me feel good. I kept this job until I graduated from college and was able to go on to bigger and better things. The next job I got (ages 21 to 23) was with the City of Philadelphia. Part of the orientation in that job was that we were to address our fellow employees (at least during working hours) as “Mister” or “Miss” (plus surname). I remember a fellow employee whose name was Gerry Trahey. He and I were the same age and had started on the job at the
same time. We became friends and often socialized after hours. (This was, of course, back in my pre-seminary days, when “going out with girls” was appropriate!) Gerry had a girlfriend and I had a girlfriend. We would sometimes go out on what were then called “double dates”. Frequently, out of habit, he and I found ourselves inadvertently addressing one another as “Mr. Connolly” and “Mr. Trahey” even outside the work environment. This, of course, became a source of amusement between us and we often “Mistered” one another deliberately, just for the fun of it.
I look back on those days with considerable fondness.

HOWEVER,
lest I forget to make the point that I want to make by putting all of this into the bulletin, let me get to the main point:

PARENTS, GRANDPARENTS, TEACHERS and OTHERS WHO ARE IN CHARGE OF RAISING CHILDREN WOULD DO THE CHILDREN (AND SOCIETY) A GREAT FAVOR IF THEY WERE TO INSTRUCT THEM (TRAIN THEM) IN COURTESY AND, IN PARTICULAR, ON THE USE OF WHAT ARE CALLED “TITLES OF COURTESY”.

Allow me, please, to stroll back to “memory lane”. (I am exercising one of the privileges of age!) Old men and old women have the privilege of talking about “how things used to be”. And, believe it or not, “the way things used to be” is often (I did not say “always”) the way things ought to be now. We try to pick out the best from the past in order to re-establish it in the present. Respect for the past is what it means to be conservative. Trying to return to the past is reactionary. “Conservative” is good. “Reactionary” is not good!
When I was in the Seminary (1961-66), there was an old, retired priest whom I often encountered as he was taking one of his frequent walks on campus. I always greeted him with “Hello, Father Spencer”! He invariably greeted me with “Hello, Mister Connolly”! Those greetings were about the extent of my relationship with that old priest. But I remember that I felt great respect and affection for him. He certainly had every right to call me “Edward” but he chose to call me “Mister Connolly”. For this courtesy of his — above and beyond the call of duty — I remain ever grateful. It had an impact on me that remains to this day.
I’ll close this essay with the first stanza of a poem by Hilaire Belloc, the title of which is “Courtesy”.

Of Courtesy, it is much less
Than Courage of Heart or Holiness,
Yet in my Walks it seems to me
That the Grace of God is in Courtesy.

stjos/stvdp: 06.10.2012 - 06 / 07


 

FATHER ROBERT R. FAGAN,
pastor emeritus of St. Jerome Parish, Tamaqua, died this past Tuesday (05 June) at the age of 80.
Ordained in 1958, he had been a priest of the Diocese for 54 years.
Of local interest is the fact that Fr. Fagan started off as a priest here in Girardville!
His first assignment was as assistant pastor at St. Vincent dePaul Parish, Girardville (1958-59). (This was during the time when Fr. Degutis was pastor.)
He did not stay long at StVdP Parish. His second assignment (believe it or not!) was as assistant pastor at St. Joseph Parish, Girardville (towards the end of Fr. McArdle’s time and the beginning of Msgr. King’s time as pastor). His time at St. Joseph’s was also short (1959-60).
Out of curiosity, I went to the Baptism registers of the two parishes for the time period 1958 to 1960. Apparently, Fr. Fagan did not perform any baptisms while at StVdP Parish. (Fr. Buikus had them all!) But he did have at least seven baptisms at St. Joseph Church. In chronological order, the babies baptized by Fr. Fagan are the following: Concetta Catizone; Thomas D. Heywood; Mary Ann Wayne; Mary Hullihan; David V. O’Connell; David Grady; Theresa R. Malafarina.
It is part of Catholic piety that a person should pray for the priest (or deacon) who baptized him or her. So, I recommend to the persons listed above that they say a prayer for the happy repose of Fr. Fagan’s soul.
I have respectful and affectionate memories of Fr. Fagan. He was a gentle, kind and good-humored man. He exuded humility. I had the good fortune to be a colleague of his at Allentown Central Catholic High School, way back in the late 1960s.
In addition to having served as pastor at St. Jerome Parish, Tamaqua, Fr. Fagan also served as pastor at Holy Family Parish (now Holy Cross Parish), New Philadelphia.
Fathers Brennan and Connolly concelebrated the funeral Mass for Fr. Fagan in St. Jane Frances deChantal Church, Easton PA, on Friday, 08 June. Bishop Barres was the principal celebrant and Bishop Cullen was one of the concelebrants.
The homilist, Msgr. Steve Radocha, told the congregation that Fr. Fagan had specifically asked him to remind people to pray for his soul. Whether Fr. Fagan is already in Heaven or is in Purgatory awaiting entrance into Heaven is something known but to God (and the angels and saints). Good Catholics “take the safer course” and pray for the dead “that they may be loosed from their sins”.
I ask everyone to take a minute to say the following prayer:
Eternal rest grant unto Father Bob Fagan, O Lord, and let the perpetual light shine upon him. May his soul and the souls of all the faithful departed, through the mercy of God, rest in peace. Amen.
PLEASE REMEMBER THE POOR! Donate food (back of church) and / or put something into the poor boxes.
THE CANDLE IN FRONT OF THE INFANT OF PRAGUE STATUE (StVdP Church) burns this week in memory of Jonas and Rita Smith, at the request of Sharon Smith.

stjos/stvdp: 06.10.2012 - 08


 

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