MASS SCHEDULE: 2229 APRIL
SAINT
JOSEPH CHURCH
GIRARDVILLE

Saturday, 21 April
Vigil of Sunday
05:30 pm — CONCETTA CATIZONE and other deceased members of the family
by Mickey Catizone

Sunday, 22 April
Third Sunday of Easter
11:30 am — MARY MALINCHOK
by Bernadine Chupasko

Monday, 23 April
St. George, martyr; St. Adalbert, bishop, martyr (OptMems)
08:00 am — JOANNE GIBAS
by OPM

Tuesday, 24 April
St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen, priest, martyr (OptMem)
07:00 pm — WILLIAM F. HILL Jr.
by OPM

Wednesday, 25 April
St. Mark, evangelist (Fst)
08:00 am — God’s blessings and health: ALEXANDER JAMES GONTIS
by Jim and Eva Gontis

Thursday, 26 April
Easter Weekday
08:00 am — ESTHER BARTASHUS
by OPM

Friday, 27 April
Easter Weekday
08:00 am — EDGAR DAWSON MD
by Jim and Cindy Coyle

Saturday, 28 April
St. Peter Chanel, priest, martyr; St. Louis Grignion deMontfort, priest (OptMems)
08:00 am — Msgr. JOHN P. GREENE
by EBC
Vigil of Sunday
05:30 pm — KATHLEEN KELLY RITRO
by Jay and Tiffany (Gillis) Newswanger

Sunday, 29 April
Fourth Sunday of Easter
10:00 am — JOSEPH and ANNA BALULIS
by Jim and Cindy Coyle
11:30 am — Msgr. FRANCIS X. CONNOLLY
by his brother, Edward

 MASS SCHEDULE: 2229 APRIL
SAINT
Vincent dePAUL CHURCH
GIRARDVILLE 
     

Saturday, 21 April
Vigil of Sunday
04:00 pm — Deceased: CHIKOTAS FAMILY
by Anna Chikotas

Sunday, 22 April
Third Sunday of Easter
08:30 am — SOPHIE DOBROSIELSKI D’ALFONSO
by Jim and Marie Cairns, Rose Garbetti and Eugenia Bertucci

Monday, 23 April
St. George, martyr; St. Adalbert, bishop, martyr (OptMems)
07:00 pm — CORA PRETTI
by OPM

Tuesday, 24 April
St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen, priest, martyr (OptMem)
08:00 am — JOSEPH V. KRICK
by his wife, Carole

Wednesday, 25 April
St. Mark, evangelist (Fst)
07:00 pm — LEONARD KUPERAVAGE
by OPM

Thursday, 26 April
Easter Weekday
07:00 pm — MARIA GRACCO
by Robert and Karen Dallago

Friday, 27 April
Easter Weekday
05:00 pm — ANTHONY J. BURKE
by OPM

Saturday, 28 April
Vigil of Sunday
04:00 pm — ADOLF and MARY PETROUSKY
by Edward and Barbara Wascavage and Samantha

Sunday, 29 April
Fourth Sunday of Easter
08:30 am — DECEASED: FISHER FAMILY
by Jim and Georgann Connell

stjos/stvdp: 04.22.2012 - 01


COLLECTION TOTALS FROM LAST WEEKEND:
14 / 15 APRIL


Saint Joseph Parish
:
Receipts for parish purposes: $1,120.00 from the Sunday envelopes; $49.00 from the second collection (plate); $152.00 from the Dues envelopes; $87.00 from the Building maintenance envelopes; $1.00 from the Holy Thursday envelopes; $625.00 from the Easter envelopes; $70.00 from the loose.
Total: $2,104.00
Receipts for non-parish purposes: $25.00 from the Rice Bowl envelopes; $7.00 from the Shrines of the Holy Land envelopes
Analysis: When one deducts from the total of the receipts for parish purposes ($2,104.00) our weekly financial obligation to the Diocese, i.e. assessments ($329.54), plus our weekly premium for property and casualty insurance ($464.00), plus our weekly subsidy to Trinity Academy ($358.17), the sum total of which is $1,151.17, one sees that $952.83 is available from this collection for operating the parish.

Saint Vincent DePaul Parish:
Receipts for parish purposes: $937.00 from the Sunday envelopes; $79.00 from the second collection (plate); $20.00 from the Dues envelopes; $36.00 from the Building maintenance envelopes; $20.00 from the Holy Thursday envelopes; $85.00 from the Easter envelopes; $82.00 from the loose.
Total: $1,259.00
Receipts for non-parish purposes: $3.00 from the Rice Bowl envelopes; $20.00 from the Shrines of the Holy Land envelopes
Analysis: When one deducts from the total of the receipts for parish purposes ($1,259.00) our weekly financial obligation to the Diocese, i.e. assessments ($229.38), plus our weekly premium for property and casualty insurance ($282.46), plus our weekly subsidy to Trinity Academy ($250.98), the sum total of which is $762.82, one sees that $496.18 is available from this collection for operating the parish.

CONFESSION SCHEDULE THIS WEEK

Wednesday, 25 April
02:30 to 03:30 pm
St. Vincent dePaul Church

Thursday, 26 April
06:00 to 07:00 pm
St. Vincent dePaul Church

Friday, 27 April
06:30 to 07:30 pm
St. Joseph Church

EXPOSITION OF THE BLESSED SACRAMENT

Wednesday, 25 April
02:00 to 04:00 pm
St. Vincent dePaul Church
Scripture Rosary at about 03:40 pm, followed by Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament

Friday, 27 April
06:00 to 08:00 pm
St. Joseph Chapel

Vespers at about 07:30 pm, followed by Chaplet of Divine Mercy,
concluding with Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament

stjos/stvdp: 04.22.2012 - 02


There is a man whose name is Peter Albert David Singer. He is the Professor of Bio-Ethics at Princeton University. Professor Singer teaches that no newborn child should be considered a “person” until thirty days after birth. He teaches, moreover, that killing disabled babies could be considered a morally virtuous act.
Allow me to run by you some actual quotes from the writings of Professor Singer. I shall refrain from commenting on them (although I shall make one teeny little comment at the bottom of this page). I print Professor Singer’s words here in this bulletin so that we might have some idea of “what’s out there” and what kind of battle the Catholic Church is involved in. It is not a battle against mere flesh and blood.

 

 

“Human babies are not born self-aware, or capable of grasping that they exist over time. They are not persons.”

“The life of a newborn is of less value than the life of a pig, a dog, or a chimpanzee.”

In one of his more compassionate moments, he said the following, in which he allowed for certain limitations on killing infants:

“We should certainly put very strict conditions on permissible infanticide, but these conditions might owe more to the effects of infanticide on others than to the intrinsic wrongness of killing an infant.”

Professor Singer wrote of the benefit of killing an infant with hemophilia:

“When the death of a disabled infant will lead to the birth of another infant with better prospects of a happy life, the total amount of happiness will be greater if the disabled infant is killed. The loss of the happy life for the first infant is outweighed by the gain of a happier life for the second. Therefore, if killing the hemophiliac infant has no adverse effect on others, it would, according to the total view, be right to kill him.”

Professor Singer has written an article in favor of scientific experiments on embryos called, “Why we should ignore the Catholic Church on stem cells.” In it he says the following:

“But when the human beings in question are surplus embryos, unwanted by their genetic parents, with no brain, no nervous system and no future, we should not elevate them to a higher status than we give to non-human animals. On the contrary: so long as the research will ensure that the embryos are destroyed before they are capable of experiencing anything, surplus human embryos are an ideal laboratory tool. Much better to use them, if we can use them to save the lives of more developed human beings, than to use “lab animals”.

So, you see, dear brothers and sisters, it comes down to this: It’s either the Catholic Church or it’s Professor Singer. Having given it due consideration, I opt for the Catholic Church. I trust you will do the same.

stjos/stvdp:04.22.2012 - 03


WHY DOESN’T THE CATHOLIC CHURCH SELL ALL ITS ART WORK AND REAL ESTATE AND OTHER TREASURES AND GIVE THE MONEY TO THE POOR?
That’s a question that has been asked countless times, most of the time (although not all of the time) by persons who are antagonistic to the Church.
How do we answer such a question?
Well, let’s start off by asking the same question about other entities that own works of art, real estate and other treasures.
• Why doesn’t the City of New York sell the Metropolitan Museum of Art and its contents and use the proceeds to take care of the poor people in New York City?
• Why doesn’t the City of Philadelphia sell the Philadelphia Museum of Art and its contents and use the proceeds to take care of the poor people of Philadelphia?
• Why doesn’t the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania sell the Capitol Building in Harrisburg (probably the most beautiful of all fifty state capitol buildings) and its priceless works of art and use the proceeds to take care of the poor people of Pennsylvania?
• Why doesn’t the government of India sell the Taj Mahal and use the proceeds to take care of the countless poor people of India?
• Why doesn’t the government of France sell the Louvre and use the proceeds to take care of the poor people of France?
• Why doesn’t the Church of Latter Day Saints sell its magnificent temples (Salt Lake City and elsewhere) and their beautiful contents and use the proceeds to take care of the poor?
• Why doesn’t the government of Russia sell The Hermitage and its contents and use the proceeds to take care of the poor?
• Why doesn’t the government of the United Kingdom sell Buckingham Palace and a few other assorted palaces, plus the crown jewels, put the royal family up in more modest digs, buy the queen some rhinestones for dress-up occasions and use the proceeds to take care of the poor?
• Why doesn’t the government of the State of Israel sell the Israel Museum (in Jerusalem) and its priceless architectural treasures and works of art and use the proceeds to take care of the poor?
• Why doesn’t St. Vincent dePaul Church in Girardville (PA) remove its magnificent (and very valuable) stained glass windows, replace them with plain glass, sell the stained-glass and use the proceeds to take care of the poor?
• Why doesn’t the government of the United States sell the Smithsonian Institute and its contents, plus the National Gallery of Art, plus Yellowstone National Park and some other national parks and use the proceeds to take care of the poor (or to help lower the national debt)? (And, while we’re at it, we could also sell Mount Rushmore, the Washington Monument, the Lincoln Monument, the Jefferson Memorial and the Tidal Basin.)
• And we could go on and on and on. You get the point, do you not?
• While I’m on a roll, why don’t YOU sell some of your luxury possessions (whatever YOU don’t strictly need for your daily sustenance) and use the proceeds to take care of the poor?
• And, of course, why don’t I do the same?
But, of course, someone will say that the Catholic Church is different, because the Catholic Church is supposed to be a spiritual organization and spiritual organizations shouldn’t need material goods.
Well, of course, that’s where “someone” is wrong! The Catholic Church is NOT a purely spiritual organization. There are only two kinds of “pure spirits”, viz. God and angels. The Catholic Church is a human organization, not a “pure spirit organization”. All human organizations, by definition, are both spirit and matter.
Why is it that the Catholic Church is so often singled out when it comes to possession of material goods, as if the mere possession of material goods were, in and of itself, something sinful or dirty or unworthy? Dare I say that it is due to good, old-fashioned bigotry?
We need to look at the Bible. Read Exodus 25 to 28. This records God’s instructions to Moses about the building of the sanctuary. There is no room in this bulletin article to do much quoting of the text, so read it for yourself. See whether or not God was interested in “the very best” for the construction and adornment of the sanctuary and for the vestments of the priests. Then read 1 Kings 06 to 07. These chapters give us God’s instructions to Solomon for the building and adornment of the Temple in Jerusalem. Once again, see whether or not God was interested in “the very best” for His Temple and its furnishings.
And, of course, there is the classic passage in the New Testament. Read Matthew 26, 06-13. It’s about the woman who came up to Jesus “with an alabaster jar of costly perfumed oil” and who poured the oil on Jesus’ head. This prompted some of the disciples to complain: “Why this waste? It could have been sold for much and the money given to the poor!” Jesus rebuked them with the oft-quoted remark: “Why do you make trouble for the woman? She has done a good thing for Me. The poor you will always have with you; but you will not always have Me.”
I think of this verse whenever I hear people complain about the expensive and beautiful items that are to be found in many churches for the sake of divine worship.
An important point to make is this: The Catholic Church is not primarily a philanthropic organization. She is in existence primarily to draw human beings to God. Secondary reasons for the existence of the Catholic Church are these: (a) to help the poor and (b) to preserve civilization.
When it comes to helping the poor, I ask everyone to assimilate and digest the following fact: THERE IS NO NATION IN THE WORLD, NO AGENCY IN THE WORLD (and that includes the United Nations Organization) THAT DOES MORE FOR THE POOR THAN THE CATHOLIC CHURCH.
In regard to the preservation of civilization, the Catholic Church performs an immense service to the human race by serving as curator of much of the artistic beauty that has been generated over the past two thousand years by human beings throughout the world.
The Vatican does not “get rich” by means of its possession of treasures of art. On the contrary, it risks “getting poor” by possessing them, because it has to take care of them. Much like art museums everywhere, the Vatican does an immense service to civilization by caring for the art work entrusted to it and by making it accessible to people of all faiths who care to come and gawk at it and to study it.
Someone calculated (and I cannot vouch for the accuracy of this, but it seems reasonable) that, if the Vatican were to sell all of its art work and distribute the proceeds to the poor, each poor person in the world would get about thirty cents!
The fact is this: Pope Benedict XVI, although he is perceived as being “all powerful” in matters of Church governance, does not have the right or the authority to sell or to give away a single building or statue or painting from the Vatican. It does not belong to him! It belongs to him as much as St. Joseph Church and St. Vincent dePaul Church belong to the current pastor!
These buildings and treasures belong to THE PEOPLE and it’s not clear to me that the people have authorized either Pope Benedict or yours truly to sell them and give away the proceeds.

stjos/stvdp: 04.22.2012 - 04 / 05


WOULD SEAN THORNTON MARRY A MAN?
WOULD MARY KATE DANAHER MARRY A WOMAN?
WOULD SEAN THORNTON USE A CONDOM?
WOULD MARY KATE DANAHER TAKE A BIRTH CONTROL PILL?

Lest you don’t recognize the names, how about if we change them to “John Wayne” and “Maureen O’Hara” in “The Quiet Man”?
Now you remember, do you not?
And, if you do not, you must be very young. In which case, I suggest you go out and buy or rent the DVD and take it home and watch it!
It is (in my opinion) one of the truly memorable movies of all time!
What I like so much about it (at least part of what I like about it) is that Sean Thornton is a DANGEROUS man and that Mary Kate Danaher is a DANGEROUS woman.
Their courtship and their marriage are fraught with danger! This is due to the fact that Sean is a man and that Mary Kate is a woman — if you know what I mean and, if you don’t know what I mean, you are, indeed, very, very young or else hopelessly jaded.
Why is a man dangerous? A man is dangerous because he carries within himself the capacity to generate a child!!
Why is a woman dangerous? A woman is dangerous because she carries within herself the capacity to conceive a child!!
True love between a man and a woman — I am referring, of course, to marital love — is always dangerous.
It is dangerous because, when it is given full expression and if the timing is right and if the moon and the tides are at their full, then this true love is capable of banging upon the doors of God Most High in order to demand that the Holy One (blessed be He) do His most awesome work, which is the creation of a human soul and the infusion of same into the mysterious entity that derived from the union of the dangerous man and the dangerous woman — who are now rightly called “father” and “mother”.
The marriage bed is a place of sacrifice. In that case, the marriage bed is like an altar.
An altar is a place on which gifts are placed for the Beloved. When we offer Mass, we place bread and wine on the altar as gifts for God the Father, Who is our Beloved.
Our Beloved accepts the bread and wine. By the power of His Spirit, He transubstantiates them and gives them back to us as the Body and Blood of His Son.
We give bread and wine. We receive back a Person. Like the marriage bed, do you see?
Mary Kate was a strong-headed woman. For a time, she refused to give her body to her husband, Sean. She justified this in her head because Sean had refused to demand that her brother, Squire Danaher, hand over her dowry. So, she punished Sean.
But, after a rollicking good donnybrook, Sean convinces Squire Danaher to hand over the dowry. Then Sean puts his arm around Mary Kate and they make their way to the altar that is their bed, there to do the deed that is so dangerous and so holy and so good, the procreation of a child!
If you don’t know the answers to the questions at the top of this page, you really should go watch “The Quiet Man”. If you already have watched it, watch it again.

stjos/stvdp: 04.22.2012 - 06


MASS IN THE EXTRAORDINARY FORM (“Tridentine Mass”) will be celebrated in St. Joseph Church (upper church) next Sunday (29 April) at 11:30 am.
MASS IN THE ORDINARY FORM (“Novus Ordo Mass”) will be celebrated in St. Joseph Chapel next Sunday (29 April) at 10:00 am.
WE SHARE THE MAIL
The following is an excerpt from an email I received recently from one of my nephews, Edward P. O’Reilly. It has to do with his son, Nolan. The reference to “Friday” is to “Good Friday”.
Hi, Uncle Ed:
Funny story ….... Last Friday, as we were about to get in line for the Veneration of the Cross, the priest said that we can venerate the cross by, "... kissing, touching, or genuflecting in front of the cross. It's your choice." I told Nolan (4 years old) to go up and kiss the cross.
Nolan thought for a moment and said, "Daddy, it's my choice, not yours." I said, "OK, what are you going to do?" Nolan again thought for a moment and said, "I'll kiss it." He's a funny kid. Hopefully he continues to make good decisions.
We love you and hope you are doing well.
Ed
My comment
: Anyone who chooses to kiss the crucifix is a friend of mine! Way to go, Nolan!
THE CANDLE IN FRONT OF THE IMAGE OF THE INFANT OF PRAGUE at St. Vincent dePaul Church burns this week in memory of Bob and June O’Connell, at the request of Sharon Smith.
FIRST HOLY COMMUNION children will meet tomorrow (Monday) evening with Fr. Connolly at 07:00 pm in St. Vincent dePaul Rectory. This will be our third of six meetings. After this meeting, I anticipate that I shall tell the children that they are now “certified” to make their first sacramental Confessions! They should do so according to the schedule that is printed in the bulletin. If this is difficult or impossible, parents should call me for a particular appointment. It is psychologically preferable that the children go according to the usual schedule.

 REMEMBER TO VOTE ON TUESDAY, 24 APRIL!
This is the Pennsylvania Primary Election.
In a primary election, one must vote according to party registration.
I have no particular information to convey at this time.
I shall save such information for the General Election in November.

 LAST CALL FOR LOTTERY TICKETS!
St. Vincent dePaul Parish will be chancing off a “lottery tree”.
Right now, we are asking all parishioners to donate some instant tickets (rub-offs) to decorate the tree. If you have already donated some, thank you. If not, please do so ASAP. Put your donations into the collection basket or else bring them to the Rectory.

stjos/stvdp: 04.22.2012 - 07



SAINT GEORGE THE MARTYR is one of the most popular saints in the Catholic Church. His feast day is tomorrow (Monday, 23 April).
Here are a few facts and thoughts about St. George.
First of all, lest anyone think otherwise, he was — come to think of it, still is! — a real person.
The reason we emphasize that he was “a real person” is that some might have you think otherwise, due to the fact that he is said to have “slain a dragon”. Some people, when they hear about “slaying dragons” immediately dismiss the story and say that the whole thing is a myth.
I wouldn’t be too quick to dismiss it and I’ll tell you why.
George’s year of birth is given sometimes as “somewhere between” AD 275 and 281. (They didn’t always keep real accurate records back then.)
His date of death is given more precisely: 23 April 303.
He was a native of Syria, a Roman soldier, a member of the Diocletian Guard.
He converted to the Christian Faith and, since this was a definite “no-no” back in those days (the Roman persecution lasted until AD 314) and was a particularly grievous “no-no” for members of the Roman military, George was put to death.
(Before I forget it, please note that there is a window in St. Vincent dePaul Church in honor of St. George. Go take a look at it. Lithuanian for “George” is “Jurgis”.)
Back to George and the Dragon: The incident is said to have taken place in what is today called “Libya”, but back then was called “Cyrene” (as in Simon the Cyrenian!)
George happened to be passing by a pond, as large as a lake, where a plague-bearing dragon dwelt that wrote havoc on the people and the livestock of the area.
In order to appease the dragon, the people fed it two sheep every day. When this was insufficient to appease the dragon, the people fed it children, chosen by lottery.
On the particular day when George was riding past the lake, it was the King’s daughter who was the chosen victim. The girl was dressed as a bride and brought to the lake.
When the dragon came up to seize the girl, George made the sign of the Cross and charged the dragon with his lance, killing it. George then preached the Gospel to the King and the people of the town. In gratitude, they converted to Christianity.
The sword used by George to do the deed was named “Ascalon”.
Interesting side note: St. George is the patron saint of England and “Ascalon” was the name that Winston Churchill gave to the private airplane that he used to go here and there during the Second World War.
My comment: When I was living in Yucatan during the summer of 1963, I was taken to a pond in the ancient Mayan city of Chichen-Itza. I was told that, back in the bad old days, it was customary for the people to sacrifice young girls to the demon who lived in the pond, in order to appease him and keep him from harming them. When the Catholic missionaries arrived, they did away with this cruel and superstitious custom. When I connect this factual information with the story of St. George and the Dragon, the latter makes more sense to me and I find that I have no trouble believing in the essential truth being conveyed, viz. that where Christ Jesus is, there is an end to superstitious slavery to evil and an end to the demonic killing of children.

stjos/stvdp: 04.22.2012 - 08

 


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