MASS SCHEDULE: 1522 AUGUST 2010
SAINT
JOSEPH CHURCH
GIRARDVILLE


Saturday, 14 August
Vigil of the Assumption
04:00 pm — RITA LECKNER FALZARANO
by Muriel Pucetas and son, William

Sunday, 15 August
Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Sol)
08:30 am — ALBERT J. GILLIS
by John and Mary Gillis

Tuesday, 17 August
Weekday
08:00 am — MARGARET RYAN WHEELER
by her sister, Elizabeth Ryan

Thursday, 19 August
St. John Eudes, priest (OptMem)
07:00 pm — MARGARET KRICK (2nd anniversary)
by the Labie family

Saturday, 21 August
Vigil of Sunday
04:00 pm — JOSEPH CRESS
by Raymond and Roseann Wayne

Sunday, 22 August
21st Sunday in Ordinary Time
08:30 am — GEORGE and ANN WHYTENA and PATRICK
by Jim and Georgann Connell

 MASS SCHEDULE: 1522 AUGUST 2010
SAINT
Vincent dePAUL CHURCH
GIRARDVILLE

                      
Saturday, 14 August
Vigil of the Assumption
04:00 pm — RITA LECKNER FALZARANO
by Muriel Pucetas and son, William

Sunday, 15 August
Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Sol)
08:30 am — ALBERT J. GILLIS
by John and Mary Gillis

Tuesday, 17 August
Weekday
08:00 am — MARGARET RYAN WHEELER
by her sister, Elizabeth Ryan

Thursday, 19 August
St. John Eudes, priest (OptMem)
07:00 pm — MARGARET KRICK (2nd anniversary)
by the Labie family

Saturday, 21 August
Vigil of Sunday
04:00 pm — JOSEPH CRESS
by Raymond and Roseann Wayne

Sunday, 22 August
21st Sunday in Ordinary Time
08:30 am — GEORGE and ANN WHYTENA and PATRICK
by Jim and Georgann Connell

stjos/stvdp: 08.15.2010 - 01


COLLECTION TOTALS FROM LAST WEEKEND:
07 / 08 AUGUST


Saint Joseph Parish
:
Receipts for parish purposes: Receipts for parish purposes: $971.00 from the Sunday envelopes; $45.00 from the second collection (plate); $60.00 from the Dues envelopes; $193.00 from the Building Maintenance envelopes; $116.00 from the loose.
Total: $1,385.00.
Receipts for non-parish purposes: — 0 —
Analysis: When one deducts from the total of the receipts for parish purposes ($1,385.00) our weekly financial obligation to the Diocese, i.e. assessments ($229.38), plus our weekly premium for property and casualty insurance ($282.46), plus our weekly subsidy to Trinity Academy ($250.98), the sum total of which is $762.82, one sees that $622.18 is available from this collection for operating the parish.



Saint Vincent DePaul Parish:
Receipts for parish purposes: Receipts for parish purposes: $971.00 from the Sunday envelopes; $45.00 from the second collection (plate); $60.00 from the Dues envelopes; $193.00 from the Building Maintenance envelopes; $116.00 from the loose.
Total: $1,385.00.
Receipts for non-parish purposes: — 0 —
Analysis: When one deducts from the total of the receipts for parish purposes ($1,385.00) our weekly financial obligation to the Diocese, i.e. assessments ($229.38), plus our weekly premium for property and casualty insurance ($282.46), plus our weekly subsidy to Trinity Academy ($250.98), the sum total of which is $762.82, one sees that $622.18 is available from this collection for operating the parish.

 CONFESSION SCHEDULE THIS WEEK

Tuesday, 17 August
02:30 to 03:30 pm
St. Vincent dePaul Church

Thursday, 19 August
06:00 to 07:00 pm
St. Vincent dePaul Church

Friday, 20 August
06:30 to 07:30 pm
St. Joseph Chapel




If these times don't suit you, you can always call for an appointment to go to Confession. If you don't like Fr. Connolly, you can always confess your sins to Kateri, but keep in mind that she is not bound by the seal and she does tend to be a blabbermouth.

 EXPOSITION OF THE BLESSED SACRAMENT

Tuesday, 17 August
02:00 to 04:00 pm
St. Vincent dePaul Church
(Scripture Rosary at about 03:40 pm)

Friday, 20 August
06:00 to 08:00 pm
St. Joseph Chapel

(Vespers followed by Chaplet of Divine Mercy at about 07:30 pm)

“’I stand at the door and knock’ says the Lord. ‘If anyone opens to Me, I shall come in and shall sit down to supper with him.’”

stjos/stvdp: 08.15.2010 - 02


JOHN T. PETROUSKY married BARBARA ANN POWLICK on 15 August 1960. The wedding took place at St. Jude Church, Mountain Top PA. The priest who witnessed the vows was Fr. Karl H. Monahan.
The Earth having completed fifty circuits around the Sun since that day, John and Barbara have arrived at their Golden Wedding Anniversary.
How many days have passed since 15 August 1960? Well, let’s do the math!

50 years X 365 days = 18,250 days.
Add 12 more to account for the leap years.
18,250 + 12 = 18,262

John and Barbara have been husband and wife for 18,262 days!
It is safe to assume that many of those days have been “good days” and, no doubt, there have been some that have been “not-so-good days”.
But, come good day, come not-so-good day, John and Barbara have been faithful and true to one another — for which we give thanks to God.
They have brought four children into the world: Thomas J. Petrousky; Andrew J. Petrousky Sr.; Barbara Ann Petrousky Wascavage; Karen M. Petrousky Wade.
They have been blessed with eight grandchildren: Andrew J. Petrousky Jr.; John C. Petrousky; Lindsey M. Petrousky; Dana L. Petrousky; Edward M. Wascavage (deceased); Samantha M. Wascavage; Brittani P. Dade; Brianna K. Dade.
John and Barbara will renew their marriage vows during the 08:30 am Mass today in St. Vincent dePaul Church. We anticipate that all of their children and grandchildren will be present for this celebration.
Note: I have no doubt that Edward, the beloved grandson who died two years ago, will also be present. God will make sure that he is here and is aware. Love is stronger than death.
Congratulations, Mr. and Mrs. Petrousky! Your love for one another has produced great good for our parish and for the Church.

FIFTEENTH ANNIVERSARY OF OUR LADYS CHAPEL!
The chapel of St. Joseph Church was dedicated on Tuesday, 15 August 1995. It was conceived and constructed under the guidance of Father Anthony P. Mongiello, the eleventh pastor of St. Joseph Parish. The parishioners who are recorded as being the “Chapel Construction Volunteers” are the following: William Byrne; Joseph Chiaretti; Thomas Dougherty; Veronica Flannery; Norman Flannery; Anonymous; Joseph Joyce Jr.; Kevin Joyce; Joseph Mulligan; James Neary; Teresa Maley Neary; Wade O. Richards; Joseph Tinari; Edward Whitecavage.
Something that I didn’t realize until very recently is this: The chapel was dedicated under the title “Our Lady’s Chapel”. Now that I know this, I must make it a point to refer to it by its appropriate name. The fact that the chapel was dedicated on the Solemnity of the Assumption makes this title especially appropriate.
PLEASE NOTE THAT the weekday Mass schedule for 16 to 20 August is “the basic schedule”, i.e. one Mass per day instead of two. This is due to the fact that Fr. Brennan will be away during those days. We keep in mind that the scheduling of two Masses on a weekday is a luxury made possible only by the fact that Fr. Brennan has made himself available for the celebration of Mass.
Next week, Fr. Connolly will be taking a few days vacation. So, from 23 to 26 August, we’ll be on the “short schedule” again. Fr. Brennan will be offering the Masses that Fr. Connolly usually offers.

stjos/stvdp: 08.15.2010 - 03


BISHOP’S ANNUAL APPEAL
PROGRESS REPORT

ST. JOSEPH PARISH
Total Goal: $8,243.00
Pledges and One-Time Gifts: $4,962.00
Amount Collected: $4,562.00
Percentage of Goal Achieved: 60%
Average Gift: $146
Number of donors: 34
Number of registered families: 347
Participation Rate: 10%
Amount Raised in 2009: $3,582
Participation Rate in 2009: 06%
 ST. VINCENT dePAUL PARISH
Total Goal: $5,885.00
Pledges and One-Time Gifts: $2,962.00
Amount Collected: $2,777.00
Percentage of Goal Achieved: 50%
Average Gift: $96
Number of donors: 31
Number of registered families: 120
Participation Rate: 26%
Amount Raised in 2009: $2,234
Participation Rate in 2009: 13%


Notes
#1
— I receive these two lists (the one above and the one on the next page) from the BAA Office in Allentown. I trust that these lists are accurate, although mistakes are always possible. If you are sure that you have made a donation to the 2010 BAA but your name is not on the list on page 05, please let me know. I will see that it is corrected when we print an updated list — maybe next weekend or the weekend after.
#2 — You will note that my name is listed in the St. Joseph Parish column. Allow me to explain: When I sent in my own personal 2010 donation, I had to choose a parish to which the donation would be credited. I requested that it be credited to St. Joseph Parish. But please know that, for the 2009 BAA, I chose that my donation be credited to St. Vincent dePaul Parish. So, “that’s why”, in case anyone is wondering! Like any pastor with more than one parish, I need to do some juggling! (Sometimes I think I know what it is like to be a bigamist!)
#3 — The list of names that I receive from the Diocese does not include the first names of married women. In other words, the name is given as “Mr. and Mrs. John Smith”. In such a case, I like to include the first name of the wife. In most cases I was able to do this, but not all. Also, in the case of a widow, I like to include the maiden name. Again, in most cases I was able to do this, but not all. If anyone can help me with “first names of wives” and “maiden names of widows”, please give me a call.
#4 — For the umpteen and eleventh time: Would every adult parishioner PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE make a donation to the Bishop’s Annual Appeal? After a while, I get weary from asking. I am not very good at getting people to give money. I wish I were, but I’m not. Some sort of basic insecurity, I guess. Maybe I was weaned too early. I know that, when I was in the Seminary, I applied myself to studying Sacred Scripture, but did not have the same zeal for the study of Sacred Fund Raising. Alas, how I lament the folly of my misspent youth!
#5 — A person’s motive for contributing to the BAA should be pure and noble: (a) the spreading of the Kingdom of Christ in our Diocese; (b) the general good of the Catholic Church; (c) the welfare of the poor and the disadvantaged. If, on the other hand, these pure and noble motives don’t float your boat, then God — together with His Excellency, Bishop Barres, and His Mediocrity, Fr. Connolly — is willing to settle for motives less sublime. For example, your donation to the BAA might (a) get you some time out of Purgatory; (b) get your name in the bulletin (big whoop!); (c) make it possible for one or both of our parishes to make their goals; (d) keep the pastor’s name from being consigned to the “Pastors Who Are Hopelessly Inept” drawer in the file cabinet kept in the bowels of the Chancery.

stjos/stvdp: 08.15.2010 - 04


DONORS TO THE 2010 BISHOP’S ANNUAL APPEAL

SAINT JOSEPH PARISH
BANN, Charles
BARBER, Marie A.
BYRNE, William and Nora
CHUPASKO, Bernadine (Ranieri)
CLARKE, Thomas
CONNOLLY, Edward B.
DeLUCA, Celeste
DEVINE, Dennis
DOUGHERTY, Margaret
FATULA, Irene
GILLIS, John M. and Mary Theresa
GOWER, Thomas and Jean
HOUSER, Catherine (Kennedy)
ANONYMOUS
KELLY, Arthur J.
KOWALICK, Patricia (Reiley)
McCARTHY, Philip D.
McCARTHY, Stephen
MILLER, Beverly Ann
MORAN, Elizabeth
MURRAY, Mary E.
O’DONNELL, Margaret (Lenahan)
PIKITUS, John and Helen
PRYCE, Agnes E.
ROWLAND, Eileen
SMALLWOOD, Rose Marie (Brennan)
SMITH, Frank and Phyllis
SMITH, Robert and Anna
TARONE, Joseph
WAYNE, Henry and Eileen
WAYNE, Kenneth and Anna Mae
WAYNE, Raymond and Rose Ann
WEIST, Jean (Birster)
YACKENCHICK, Albert Sr. and Annetta

 ST. VINCENT dePAUL PARISH
BOZYLINSKI, Robert
BREHM, Patrick
CHIKOTAS, Anna (Ginaitis)
CHIPLONIA, Ralph and Debra
CIKANOVICH, Peter
CONNELL, James Jr. and Georgann
CONNELL, Marilyn
FAUST, William E.
FRIGONE, Rita
GETZEY, Robert and Denise
GREGIS, John
GUDONIS, Joseph and Theresa
HALUSKA, John and Gloria
HOLY NAME SOCIETY
HOLY ROSARY SOCIETY
KRICK, Carole Anne (Doraski)
LABIE, Edna (Fetterolf)
LANG, Jean (Albo)
MEDLINSKY, Elizabeth
MOHAN, Francis P. MD and Stella
PAULOSKY, Diana
PETROUSKY, John and Barbara
POPECK, Frank and Rose
SCROBOL, George
SELGRADE, Robert and Ellen
SHERMAN, Charles and Kathy
SMOLOCK, John and Joan
STRONY, Mr. and Mrs. Stephen
VABOLIS, John and Ann
VITALE, Marie Jeanette (Winkler)
WINKLER, Helen

 

 

PARISH WEBSITE NEWS
The history of St. Joseph Parish as it appeared in last weekend’s bulletin — supplemented with photographs of the pastors and of the church at various stages in its history — will soon be posted on the parish website: http://www.stjospar.org. We anticipate very soon doing the same for St. Vincent dePaul Parish. These articles should be “up” sometime this week or next. The person who has done 99% of the work necessary in order to post these histories is
Ian R. Getzey, to whom we respectfully and gratefully tip our biretta!
And another tip of the biretta to our noble webmaster,
Bruce A. Marianelli, who faithfully posts these bulletins each week.
By the way, did you know that, over the past two years, our parish website has had 17,879 hits?

stjos/stvdp: 08.15.2010 - 05


DISCUSSING THE HIGHLY HYPOTHETICAL
In the course of a recent kitchen-table conversation, a friend of mine (a layman) put this scenario to me: Vice-President Joe Biden and Speaker Nancy Pelosi just happen to be passing through Girardville on a Saturday evening or a Sunday morning and they decide to stop into St. Joseph Church or St. Vincent dePaul Church for Mass.
So far, so good. No problem! Joe and Nancy are entirely welcome to attend Mass here in Girardville.
But then the plot thickens! They walk up the aisle and present themselves for Holy Communion!!
“What would you do?” my friend asked me. “Knowing their pro-abortion record, would you or would you not give them Holy Communion?” I paused for reflection.
I told my friend that I would whip out my cell phone and call Bishop Barres for direction!!!
My friend wouldn’t accept this as a practical answer and continued to press me for a decision.
While I was still waffling, my friend came up with this solution: He said that I should give them the benefit of the doubt, that I should presume that, at some point prior to coming to Mass, they had experienced true contrition (at least imperfect, if not perfect contrition), had gone to Confession and been absolved and were, therefore, eligible to receive Holy Communion.
I was satisfied with this solution, was glad to get off the hook, and agreed that that was what I would do the next time Joe Biden and / or Nancy Pelosi happen to show up at Mass in Girardville.
HOWEVER, if I were Mr. Biden’s or Mrs. Pelosi’s pastor — or if either or both of them were “predictable” and frequent visitors to one of my parish churches and presented themselves for Holy Communion — that would be a different matter.
In that case, I would be obliged — always with respect and good manners — to ask them to make a public renunciation of their support for legalized and tax-funded abortion before presenting themselves again for Holy Communion.
If they were to decline to make such a public renunciation, then I would consider myself obliged to refuse them Holy Communion.
I base my position on these instructions given in July 2004 to Theodore Cardinal McCarrick (at that time Archbishop of Washington) by Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger. (Since 2004, Cardinal Ratzinger has gone on to higher things, as you might know.)

4. Apart from an individual’s judgment about his worthiness to present himself to receive the Holy Eucharist, the minister of Holy Communion may find himself in the situation where he must refuse to distribute Holy Communion to someone, such as in cases of a declared excommunication, a declared interdict, or an obstinate persistence in manifest grave sin (cf. can. 915).
5. Regarding the grave sin of abortion or euthanasia, when a person’s formal cooperation becomes manifest (understood, in the case of a Catholic politician, as his consistently campaigning and voting for permissive abortion and euthanasia laws), his Pastor should meet with him, instructing him about the Church’s teaching, informing him that he is not to present himself for Holy Communion until he brings to an end the objective situation of sin, and warning him that he will otherwise be denied the Eucharist.
6. When “these precautionary measures have not had their effect or in which they were not possible,” and the person in question, with obstinate persistence, still presents himself to receive the Holy Eucharist, “the minister of Holy Communion must refuse to distribute it” (cf. Pontifical Council for Legislative Texts Declaration “Holy Communion and Divorced, Civilly Remarried Catholics” [2002], nos. 3-4). This decision, properly speaking, is not a sanction or a penalty. Nor is the minister of Holy Communion passing judgment on the person’s subjective guilt, but rather is reacting to the person’s public unworthiness to receive Holy Communion due to an objective situation of sin.

On a more practical note: Should a person present himself for Holy Communion if he deliberately votes for a pro-abortion candidate when it is possible for him to vote for a pro-life candidate? More on that later!

      stjos/stvdp: 08.15.2010 - 06   

   

LITHUANIAN CUSTOMS AND TRADITIONS: HERBAL HOLYDAY15 AUGUST
Meadow grass celebration, Feast of the Assumption
This article can be found on the following webpage: http://ausis.gf.vu.lt/eka/customs/grass.html
This is one of the most esteemed Virgin Mary's holy days, going to heaven. Lithuanian names for this holy day are "
Žoline", Herbal Holy Day and "Kopustine", Cabbage Day. The names show that this day is associated with traditions of the Christian periods, marking the juncture of summer, autumn and winter, the completion of most important agricultural labors.
This day, everyone who goes to church carries herbs, blooming garden flowers, to be blessed. The herbal bouquets also contained ears of rye, barley, oats, sweet peas, cabbages, carrots and apples.
It was said that if on this day one did not hold herbs in church, the devil will give his tail to hold.
In the spring, the blessed ears of grain were pulverized and mixed with seed grain, to assure an abundant harvest. Vegetables from the blessed bouquets were divided among all family members and some were fed to animals. Dried herbs were kept in the house, behind pictures of the saints. When thunder roared, the house was smoked with the dried herbs and sick people drank herbal teas.
Peasant women believed — and some even now believe —that thistles can be removed from fields. Uproot the thistles, place them in a bouquet with herbs and take them to be blessed on the Herbal Holy Day. Return the blessed thistles to the field, dig them under, with roots sticking out.
One more belief, if there are many children's deaths in a family, place a garden green with other herbs and, after the blessing, plant the blessed garden green on the grave of the last dead child. It was hoped that there would be no more children's deaths in the family. Houses were decorated with the blessed herbal bouquets to prevent lightning strikes. In the region of Dzukija, tradition exists to stuff blessed herbal bouquets into pillows of the dead. These blessed herbs were also used to smoke coffins.
Grain, vegetable and herb blessing is linked with sacrifice and gratitude for the new harvest. It is more difficult to explain the belief, known throughout Lithuania, that women who have dead children should not eat apples until the apples are blessed. Older women are observing this imposed ban even today. It is said if a woman has eaten just one apple before the Herbal Holy Day, her child will not receive an apple in heaven. For example, on this day Virgin Mary distributes apples among dead children; those children whose mothers do not observe this ban receive no apples. Virgin Mary says, "your mother ate your apple". In some Lithuanian villages, such women do not eat pears and plums.
The ancient tradition on Herbal Holy Day is for relatives to get together for a short visit. It is said, he who does not attend the get-together will remain poor. Fourteenth- century writers wrote that this folk belief of ancient traditions reflects autumnal gatherings. In the chronicles of M. Strijkovski, he alleges that several joint parties are organized in villages. Grain is set aside early, for beer making. There is a ritual sacrifice of cattle, their meat is cooked and eaten. Bread is baked following a ritual bread-baking on that day. Flat breads made from new harvest flour are thrown back and forth over the fire, until they are baked.
Ancient agrarian and cults-of-the-dead traditions are intertwined with traditions of Herbal Holy Day. In southern Lithuania, the tradition of celebrating the dead ancestors continues even on this day. Dead ancestors are offered foods prepared from the new harvest. Beggars are also treated to the new harvest foods, because they pray for the dead. In the morning, after all food has been prepared, the table is set and everyone sits around it. Then the master of the house lights a candle and sends it around the table, to be held by each person. When the candle has come the full round, the master of the house picks up the candle and walks three times around the foods, dedicated to the dead ancestors. Eating begins after that. Any leftover foods are taken to beggars or to old people’s homes.

translated by Asta Dumšyte

Some commentary on the article printed above
Ever since I moved to Girardville and became a Lithuanian (15 July 2008), I have been aware that August is an important month for my fellow ethnics and that 15 August (Solemnity of the Assumption) has some particular meaning for Lithuanians, above and beyond its profound religious meaning, which is for all faithful Catholics, regardless of ethnicity.
But I didn’t know why.
So, I googled around until I found this article. I thought it was interesting. It answers my question as to the peculiar significance of 15 August in Lithuanian culture.
I had some reservations about printing this article in the parish bulletin because of concern that somebody might infer that, by printing it in the bulletin, the pastor is endorsing everything it says. For the record, please note: Neither the Catholic Church nor the pastor of the Lithuanian parish in Girardville believes or wishes to perpetuate any pagan (pre-Christian) beliefs and customs. We do not believe nor do we teach any of the superstitions (Lithuanian or otherwise) that were held or practiced or handed down by our heathen ancestors. May God bless their poor, benighted heathen hearts! They just didn’t know any better. No doubt, God will cut them a break!
So, for example, please don’t worry if you don’t bring any herbs with you to church on Assumption Day. This will not prompt the devil to “give you his tail to hold”. On the other hand, if you have a husband or a son or a brother named Herb, please do bring Herb with you to church on Assumption Day. Otherwise, the devil might get hold of Herb’s tail!
And, in regard to the eating of apples by women who have a child who died, please (whatever you do!) don’t take this seriously. If there any apples to be given out to children in Heaven by the Blessed Mother — the jury is out on that one! — no child will be deprived of an apple because his mother has eaten one!
Having said all that, you will probably admit that the article is interesting. It certainly enhances my understanding of why 15 August has a special importance in Lithuania. I think it has very much to do with the pre-Christian harvest festivals and very little to do with the Assumption of the Blessed Mother.
HOWEVER (and there is always a “however”): There is a certain way in which the Assumption of Mary can be related to the concept of “harvest”. JESUS is the first born from the dead, the first fruits of the Harvest. In her being raised from the sleep of death and taken body and soul to Heaven, MARY is the second born from the dead, the “second cutting” of the harvest.
By the way, just this past Wednesday, while visiting a Byzantine Melkite monastery, I had some conversation with a Ukrainian Byzantine monk and he told me that it is the custom among Ukrainian Catholics to bring herbs to church on 15 August. So, I am guessing that the custom might be common to all or most Catholics (and Orthodox) whose origins are in eastern Europe.

stjos/stvdp: 08.15.2010 - 07  

stjos/stvdp: 08.15.2010 - 08 

 

 

 

 

 

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