MASS SCHEDULE: 0410 JULY 2010
SAINT
JOSEPH CHURCH
GIRARDVILLE


Saturday, 03 July
Vigil of Sunday
05:30 pm — JULIA CLARKE
by the Clarke Trust

Sunday, 04 July
14th Sunday of Ordinary Time
11:30 am — JOSEPH and REGINA (Andrews) GALLEN
by Joanne (Gallen) Weikel and family

Monday, 05 July
St. Anthony Mary Zaccaria, priest (OptMem)
08:00 am — MARY COUGHLIN BIRSTER
by Jean Birster Weist

Tuesday, 06 July
St. Maria Goretti, virgin, martyr (OptMem)
07:00 pm — GLORIA TINARI CHIARETTI
by Edward and Judy Haluska

Wednesday, 07 July
Weekday
08:00 am — JOSEPH C. CHIARETTI
by his wife, Alice

Thursday, 08 July
Weekday
08:00 am — CLAYTON and LILLIAN WERLEY
by Jim and Cindy Coyle

Friday, 09 July
St. Augustine Zhao Rong, priest, martyr and companions, martyrs (OptMem)
08:00 am — THOMAS MORAN
by his daughter, Thomasina

Saturday, 10 July
Weekday
08:00 am — LEO F. STAJKOWSKI
by EBC
Vigil of Sunday
05:30 pm — THOMAS NORMAN FLANNERY
by David and Dolores Kramer

Sunday, 11 July
15th Sunday of Ordinary Time
11:30 am — JOSEPH CRESS
by the Flannery family

 MASS SCHEDULE: 0410 JULY 2010
SAINT
Vincent dePAUL CHURCH
GIRARDVILLE

                      
Saturday, 03 July
Vigil of Sunday
04:00 pm — DECEASED: STATUTIS and YESAITIS FAMILIES
by Jean Statutis Majikas and family

Sunday, 04 July
14th Sunday of Ordinary Time
08:30 am — EDWARD and FRANCES LUSHIS
by Alice Walaconis Chiaretti

Monday, 05 July
St. Anthony Mary Zaccaria, priest (OptMem)
07:00 pm — CHARLES M. KETUSKY
re-scheduled from 25 June

Tuesday, 06 July
St. Maria Goretti, virgin, martyr (OptMem)
08:00 am — WILLIAM DeLUCA
by his family

Wednesday, 07 July
Weekday
07:00 pm — MARY BARTASAVAGE GRIFFITHS
by Ken, Marguerite and Nicole Botsko

Thursday, 08 July
Weekday
07:00 pm — ANNA M. RACIMAS
by Joseph and Theresa Gudonis

Friday, 09 July
St. Augustine Zhao Rong, priest, martyr and companions, martyrs (OptMem)
05:00 pm — BERNADETTE D. GRADY
by Kay Ellen Kuchinsky

Saturday, 10 July
Vigil of Sunday
04:00 pm — CHARLES M. KETUSKY
by Jim and Anna Mae Gownley

Sunday, 11 July
15th Sunday of Ordinary Time
08:30 am — DECEASED: HOLY NAME SOCIETY
by the HNS

stjos/stvdp: 07.04.2010 - 01


COLLECTION TOTALS FROM LAST WEEKEND:
26 / 27 JUNE


Saint Joseph Parish
:
Receipts for parish purposes: $991.00 from the Sunday envelopes; $52.00 from the second collection (plate); $52.00 from the Dues envelopes; $33.00 from the Building Maintenance envelopes; $74.00 from the loose. Total: $1,202.00
Receipts for non-parish purposes — $8.00 from the Peter’s Pence envelopes
Analysis: When one deducts from the total of the receipts for parish purposes ($1,202.00) our weekly financial obligation to the Diocese, i.e. assessments ($290.08), plus our weekly premium for property and casualty insurance ($444.49), plus our weekly subsidy to Trinity Academy ($358.17), the sum total of which is $1,092.74, one sees that $109.26 is available from this collection for operating the parish.


Saint Vincent DePaul Parish:
Receipts for parish purposes: $985.50 from the Sunday envelopes; $93.00 from the second collection (plate); $10.00 from the Dues envelopes; $58.00 from the Building Maintenance envelopes; $69.00 from the loose. Total: $1,215.50.
Receipts for non-parish purposes: — $50.00 from the Peter’s Pence envelopes
Analysis: When one deducts from the total of the receipts for parish purposes ($1215.50) our weekly financial obligation to the Diocese, i.e. assessments ($183.92), plus our weekly premium for property and casualty insurance ($267.81), plus our weekly subsidy to Trinity Academy ($250.98), the sum total of which is $702.71, one sees that $512.79 is available from this collection for operating the parish.

 CONFESSION SCHEDULE THIS WEEK

Thursday, 08 July
02:30 to 03:30 pm
St. Vincent dePaul Church

Thursday, 08 July
06:00 to 07:00 pm
St. Vincent dePaul Church

Friday, 09 July
06:30 to 07:30 pm
St. Joseph Chapel



If these times don't suit you, you can always call for an appointment to go to Confession. If you don't like Fr. Connolly, you can always confess your sins to Kateri, but keep in mind that she is not bound by the seal and she does tend to be a blabbermouth.

 EXPOSITION / ADORATION
OF THE BLESSED SACRAMENT

Thursday, 08 July
02:00 to 04:00 pm
St. Vincent dePaul Church
(Scripture Rosary at about 03:40 pm)

Friday, 09 July
06:00 to 08:00 pm
St. Joseph Chapel
(Chaplet of Divine Mercy at about 07:45 pm)


HUMBLY LET US VOICE OUR HOMAGE
FOR SO GREAT A SACRAMENT!
LET ALL FORMER RITES SURRENDER
TO THE LORD’S NEW TESTAMENT!

stjos/stvdp: 07.04.2010 - 02


CHILDREN REGISTERED THUS FAR FOR CONFIRMATION
CRESS, Caleb J.
DAVID, Ashley
DONMOYER, Jordan M.
FLANNERY, Robert S.
GRADY, Angel
GRADY, Timothy
GREGAS, Leanna
GREGAS, Carly J.
KLEEMAN, Anthony
KLEEMAN, Christian
McDONALD, Maura
PRYCE, Alexis
PRYCE, Gage
PRYCE, Gage
RICHARDS, Noah
RIZZARDI, Thomas J.
ROBERTS, Michael
ROCHE, Alexis
SHALAMANDA, Stephen
SMITH, Jonathan T.
WAGNER, Cody J.
WEIDNER, Madelyn C.
WEIDNER, Nathan P.
WILEY, David
WIXTED, Megan
ZAK, Victoria
IF YOUR CHILD’S NAME DOES NOT APPEAR ON THIS LIST, I DO NOT KNOW THAT HE OR SHE EXPECTS TO RECEIVE THE SACRAMENT OF CONFIRMATION ON 28 OCTOBER 2010. PARENTS ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR NOTIFYING THE PASTOR. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. PLEASE CALL THE RECTORY TO LET US KNOW.

A FEW WORDS FOR OUR MEDITATION ON THIS FOURTH OF JULY
We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and pursuit of Happiness: that to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed.
~ The Declaration of Independence (1776)

I do not mean to say that caring for the elderly and others is not a burden. It can be, sometimes significantly so. I am saying that bearing this burden is so central to being human that if we run from the burden, we not only disrespect the elderly and vulnerable, we dehumanize ourselves.
~ William E. May, “On Being a Burden to One’s Family,” Culture of Life Foundation Briefs (March 26, 2010)

Families with lots of children are no longer considered examples of generosity, but rather irresponsibility. [Our culture says that] children with severe disabilities are not special angels sent to us by God, but drains on the economy; better that they were not born. And the elderly are burdens. But if we succeed in pushing away everyone who is dependent, then we’re left with ourselves, our ego-centric, sin-rationalizing, defensive, irritable and vain selves. If we never learn to give till it hurts, till the painful reality that we’re not the center of the universe sinks in, we will fail at marriage, at parenthood, at citizenship, even at simple neighborliness.
~ William E. May (ibid)

stjos/stvdp: 07.04.2010- 03


 BISHOP’S ANNUAL APPEAL
PROGRESS REPORT

St. Joseph Parish, Girardville

Total Goal: $8,243.00
Pledges and One-Time Gifts: $4,727.00
Amount Collected: $4,097.00
Percentage of Goal Achieved: 57%
Average Gift: $158
Number of donors: 30
Number of registered families: 347
Participation Rate: 07%
Amount Raised in 2009: $3,582
Participation Rate in 2009: 06%

 St. Vincent de Paul Parish, Girardville

Total Goal: $5,885.00
Pledges and One-Time Gifts: $2,877.00
Amount Collected: $2,597.00
Percentage of Goal Achieved: 49%
Average Gift: $103
Number of donors: 28
Number of registered families: 120
Participation Rate: 20%
Amount Raised in 2009: $2,234
Participation Rate in 2009: 13%


Comment: I notice some upward movement from last weekend in the totals for both parishes. I am grateful for this. There is hardly need for me to say anything that is not already conveyed by the numbers printed here. Please, even if you cannot contribute a “huge” amount, contribute whatever you possibly can. Let us all do our part to make the goals set for us.

YOUTH MINISTRY LEADERS MEETING
If you would like to pick up some ideas for ministry to the young people of St. Vincent dePaul Parish and St. Joseph Parish, we encourage you to attend a meeting for youth ministry in our area.
Date: Saturday, 10 July
Time: 10:00 am to 12:00 noon
Place: Blessed Teresa of Calcutta Parish Hall
614 W. Mahanoy Avenue
Mahanoy City
This meeting is for both prospective adult leaders and also prospective teen leaders. To register, call Mary Ellen Johns in New Philadelphia at (570) 277-0123 or else call the Rectory.

THANK YOU!
I am grateful to all who participated in the Diocesan Holy Name Prayer Rally held on the grounds of St. Vincent dePaul Parish this past Sunday. All went well and we are grateful to the Lord for the opportunity of hosting this event. There were refreshments afterwards in the parish hall.
I wish to thank, in particular, the following Holy Name Society men and Holy Rosary Society women who did the setting up and the food preparation and the cleaning up afterwards:
Arthur Engle; Joyce Engle; John Gregas; Theresa Gudonis; Jim Kennedy; Nancy Kennedy; John Majikas; Chuck Sherman; Kathy Sherman.
I hope I didn’t forget to list anyone else who helped out. If I did, I pray thee, hold me excused!

Blessed be the Holy Name of Jesus Christ, both now and forever!



SOME CHURCH BULLETIN BLOOPERS
Newsletters are not being sent to absentees because of their weight.

Next Friday we will be serving hot gods for lunch.
Thank you, dead friends.

Diana and Don request your presents at their wedding.
We are grateful for the help of those who cleaned up the grounds around the church building and the pastor.

stjos/stvdp: 07.04.2010 - 04


THE FOLLOWING ARTICLE BY DAN KELLY APPEARED IN THE 27 JUNE 2010 EDITION OF THE READING EAGLE,
After nearly a year at the helm of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Allentown, Bishop John O. Barres found he needs to brush up on his Spanish. During an interview last week in the chancery in Allentown, Barres said one of his goals in the coming year is to be able to work closely and converse easily with Latino Catholics. So Barres, 49, is leaving Monday for a monthlong trip to Lima, Peru, where he hopes to immerse himself in Spanish language and culture. "I've spent time with the Catholic Relief Services in San Marcos, Guatemala, and a couple of weeks in Guadalajara, Mexico, and got a base for my Spanish, but I have to build on that," Barres said. "Pope John Paul II talks about the Ecclesia of America. I've found our Hispanic brothers and sisters have great insights into catechesis - the teaching and passing on of faith - that we don't have in North America. "My conversation is really rusty. I think I can tune up the base and take it to the next level." The diocese comprises Berks, Lehigh, Northampton, Schuylkill and Carbon counties, all of which have growing Latino populations. Barres also talked about his personal connection to the diocese, the need to consolidate some parishes, a shortage of priests, priesthood and marriage, and the church's child-abuse scandals. Ethnicity plays a major role in the diocese, Barres observed. The Polish, German, Irish, Italian and now Latino parishes form the foundation of the church in America and they must be preserved, he said.
Consolidating parishes
Since the 2008 order to consolidate some parishes in Schuylkill County, rumors of further consolidations have spread through the diocese, especially in Berks. Barres said there will be no further consolidations until the 14 consolidations being appealed by Schuylkill parishes are resolved. Those appeals have lingered for two years and diocesan spokesman Matt Kerr said he had no prediction on when they might be resolved. Most of the parishes have strong ethnic identities. Barres said it is very difficult to close traditionally ethnic churches. He used St. Casimir's Church in Shenandoah, Schuylkill County, as an example of a church with strong ethnic ties. That church is where the Rev. Walter Ciszek, the Polish-American Jesuit priest who spent 23 years in a Russian prison during the Cold War, was baptized as a baby. Ciszek, who is buried at the Jesuit Center near Wernersville, is being considered for sainthood. "We stand on the shoulders of these beautiful ancestors who sacrificed so much," Barres said.
More priests needed
Barres said the number of priests, parishioners and finances all figure in the decision to consolidate parishes. "There has not been a liturgy or a function where I haven't spoken for the need for all of us - not just priests, but lay people as well, to be agents of the call to the priesthood," Barres said. "I have real expectations and high hopes that some great things are percolating in terms of vocations," he said. And recruiting new priests isn't rocket science, Barres said. "We had a holy hour at the cathedral; had some pizza and then had some cell phone numbers of mostly college students," he said. "Every priest would call the students that they knew and at the end (of the conversation) they would put me on with them and I talked to them. "Even if the young man wasn't remotely interested in the priesthood, it was a good investment because they had contact with a great priest and they knew their bishop was praying for them. "What we find is that personal contact is absolutely key."
Clergy abuse
Barres doesn't mince words when talking about abuse of the young by clergy. "Clergy sexual abuse is a crime," Barres said. "It is a terrible sin. It has absolutely devastating consequences on the victims and their families, and the church is taking responsibility for the history of this." The church is trying to ensure that abuses are not repeated, he added. "These wounds are so deep and so painful that you never fully step into the pain, but we have to be as vibrant instruments of healing as we possibly can," Barres said. "All of us are called to be beacons of hope for the victims and their families who deal with these wounds the rest of their lives. It is absolutely crucial to me."
Marriage and priesthood
Barres said marriage could be a distraction from true holiness for priests. He said he doesn't buy into the argument that more men would become priests if they could also get married and have families. "There is something special about the celibate commitment," Barres said. "The radical focus on the consecration of mission that is Eucharistic, that is biblical, that is missionary: That celibate commitment is so beautiful." Priests must be able to focus on their work, he said. "Priests must be intellectually engaged," Barres said. "That's important in terms of the issues of the day, but also in terms of being able to articulate the Catholic experience and Catholic teaching in the prism of contemporary experience."
A personal connection
"My whole family history runs through Bethlehem," the bishop said. "My father grew up across from Liberty High School. My great-grandfather was a night watchman in Bethlehem for 38 years. One of his sons, Grover Ritter, was a tailor in Reading." Barres said he visited recently with Grover Ritter's daughter-in-law, Bonnie Ritter, Wyomissing, who is 86 and a retired Wyomissing High School art teacher. "I was getting some of the beautiful stories and getting a sense of the Reading connection in my family," Barres said. "When I go into South Bethlehem or Reading, realizing some of my ancestors had their lives and their families there, that's very powerful to me. "Every summer from 1967, when I was 7, until I was about 20 years old, we'd come back. My great-grandparents are buried on the banks of the Lehigh River on a hill looking over the steel mills. "I remember going to that cemetery when I was 7 and seeing that family plot for the first time and it was my first experience of mortality. That place has kind of a special place in my memory. "The deeper we get into history, the more we are able to chart paths into the future."

stjos/stvdp: 07.04.2010 - 05


ADRIAN JEROME KILKER,
a member of St. Joseph Parish, died on Wednesday, 30 June.
Born on 25 March 1934, he was 76 years old.
Adrian is one of the five children of the late Cyril and Elizabeth (Heiler) Kilker.
Born in Philadelphia, he was baptized in that city, but his First Holy Communion (18 May 1941) and his Confirmation (12 October 1942) took place in St. Joseph Church, Girardville.
Two of Adrian’s brothers are deceased: John M. Kilker and Cyril C. Kilker.
He is survived by his brother, Michael Kilker, and by his sister, Elizabeth (“Honey”) Kilker.
A Memorial Mass will be celebrated in St. Joseph Church, Girardville on Saturday, 31 July, at 11:00 am. The interment will take place in Annunciation BVM Cemetery, Shenandoah Heights.
Eternal rest grant unto Adrian, O Lord, and let the perpetual light shine upon him. May his soul and the souls of all the faithful departed, through the mercy of God, rest in peace. Amen
FATHER RICHARD A. SCHWARE, pastor of St. Joseph Parish, Sheppton and of St. Mary Parish, Ringtown, died on Thursday, 01 July. He was 62 years old. He died in St. Mary Rectory.
There will be a Mass of Christian Burial at St. Mary Church, Ringtown, on Tuesday, 06 July, at 07:00 pm. There will be a second Mass of Christian Burial at St. Thomas More Church, Allentown, on Wednesday, 07 July, at 11:00 am.
The news that Fr. Schware had died came quite unexpectedly. I have to admit to being stunned when I received the email notification from the Diocese.
I would like to express my deep respect for him and my brotherly affection.
He was (and is) a fine man and a good priest and he will be sorely missed.
May he rest from his labors, for his good deeds follow him.
Eternal rest grant unto Fr. Richard Schware, O Lord, and let the perpetual light shine upon him. May his soul and the souls of all the faithful departed, through the mercy of God, rest in peace. Amen.
WHO WILL TAKE FATHER SCHWARE’S PLACE?
I am not referring to “take his place in Ringtown / Sheppton”.
That is a decision the Bishop will have to make in due time.
I mean “take his place” in the ranks of the priesthood — specifically in the ranks of the priesthood of the Diocese of Allentown.
Surely, there are some boys and young men in the Girardville area whom God is calling to the priesthood. If you think you might be one of them, mention it to Fr. Connolly or some other priest.

 stjos/stvdp: 07.04.2010 - 06


SIGNS OF THE TIMES
I was in Allentown last week. I passed by the Hope United Church of Christ (Trexler Avenue). The message on the signboard read as follows:

GOD DOES NOT EXCLUDE

This is an interesting sentence. It needs to be analyzed.
• It is a simple declarative sentence.
• The subject of the sentence is “God”.
• The predicate (verb) of the sentence is “does not exclude”.
• The object of the sentence is non-existent!
Ah, that’s the rub! A sentence without an object!
But, you see, by omitting the object, the sentence is really inviting the reader to supply a universal object and to supply it unconditionally — so that the sentence comes to mean as follows: “God does not exclude anybody from His favor or from ultimate salvation regardless of what that person does or doesn’t do or believes or doesn’t believe and regardless of how that person acts or doesn’t act, because salvation is universal, not only in its offer but in its ultimate realization. And, so, have a nice day, everybody, because you are all going to go to Heaven and nobody is going to go to Hell. And, by the way, you really ought to join our brand of Christianity because we imitate God. Unlike those judgmental Catholics, we don’t tell you that you must not have an abortion and that abortions are sinful and we don’t tell you that you must not get divorced and get married again because that is your private business and we don’t tell you that it is a sin to live together with your girlfriend (boyfriend) without being married because we don’t really believe that that’s a sin and, even if it is, we don’t believe that sin is able to disrupt our relationship with God ever since Jesus died on the Cross for our sins, and we don’t tell you that homosexuality is a disordered condition or is in any way wrong, because we believe that God makes some people hetero and some people homo and that we should all be true to our deep inner selves, and we don’t have any litmus test for whether or not you are eligible to receive our holy communion because we believe that God does not exclude and so, we don’t either, and we definitely will not frighten your children or insult your intelligence with any preachments about “Hell”.

If you understand the point being made here, you will understand the difference between Catholicism and what is commonly known as “liberal Christianity” aka “mainstream Protestantism”.

stjos/stvdp: 07.04.2010 - 07


LAST WEEKEND’S HOMILY (26 / 27 June) prompted some questions from a couple of parishioners. (Note: I am referring to the homily given at the first three Masses, viz. the 04:00 pm, 05:30 pm and 08:30 am Masses. Because the 11:30 am Mass on the last Sunday of each month has different Scripture readings, I always give a different homily at that Mass.)
In the homily given at the first three Masses, I emphasized that we are obliged by God to obey the laws of marriage. In particular, I emphasized that a person must not enter into an invalid marriage union. In addition, I said that we Catholics must not participate in (attend) weddings that celebrate invalid marriage unions.
Someone apparently thought that I said that marriage ceremonies celebrated in Protestant churches are, ipso facto, invalid. But, of course, I said no such thing.
Without going into more detail than necessary, let me state a few simple points:
If two non-Catholics who are free to marry (i.e. were never married or are widowed) get married in the presence of a Protestant minister or a Jewish rabbi or a civil magistrate, a Catholic is certainly permitted to participate in (attend) such a wedding. Why? Because the Catholic Church recognizes that such a marriage is valid.
If two Catholics attempt to be married in the presence of someone other than a duly authorized Catholic priest (or deacon) and if they do so without a dispensation from canonical form, we must assume that this is an invalid marriage. Therefore, we must not participate in (attend) such a wedding. Why? Because, two Catholics must be married in the presence of a duly authorized priest and two witnesses.
What about a marriage between a Catholic and a non-Catholic? In such a case, the norm (especially if it is the bride who is the Catholic party) is that the marriage take place in the presence of a duly authorized priest (or deacon) and two witnesses. HOWEVER (and this is a crucial point) it is also permitted for the Catholic / non-Catholic couple (especially if it is the bride who is the non-Catholic party) to be married in the presence of a Protestant minister or a Jewish rabbi or a civil magistrate. In order for this to be accepted by the Catholic Church, the couple must apply (through the parish priest) for a DISPENSATION FROM CANONICAL FORM. It is my experience that this dispensation is readily granted.
What is a “dispensation from canonical form”? Very simply it is this: It is a permission granted by the Bishop for a couple (one Catholic and one non-Catholic) to be married by someone other than a Catholic priest or deacon. (In most cases, in my experience, this “someone other” is a Protestant minister.) Is such a marriage valid? Yes! Is such a marriage recognized by the Catholic Church? Yes! Is such a marriage holy? Yes! Such a marriage has exactly the same “standing” in the Catholic Church as if the couple were married in the presence of a priest or a deacon.
Is it necessary for the Catholic priest or deacon to participate in the ceremony in the Protestant church in order for such a marriage to be valid? The answer is “No, it is not necessary!” It is not uncommon (and, in fact, has happened many times) that the Catholic priest or deacon will be invited to the ceremony in order to read a Scripture passage or give a blessing, but this is not a requirement in order for the marriage to be considered valid. If the Catholic priest or deacon is not present, this has no effect whatsoever on the status of the marriage in the eyes of the Catholic Church.
Yours truly has participated several times in wedding ceremonies conducted in Protestant churches. I have also participated in wedding ceremonies in non-religious settings, such as hotel ballrooms, in conjunction with rabbis. In all of these cases, the couple (one Catholic and one Protestant or else one Catholic and one Jewish) had received from the Bishop a dispensation from canonical form.
Having said all of this, I need to emphasize the main points of the homily: (a) We Catholics must not enter into invalid marriages; (b) We Catholics must not participate in (attend) weddings that celebrate invalid marriages.
For example: Suppose “Joe Catholic” had married “Jane Catholic” a few years ago in the presence of a Catholic priest (or deacon) but then he ups and divorces poor old Jane. Suppose, a little later on, Joe Catholic, without having obtained a declaration of nullity of his marriage to Jane, attempts to marry “Hilda Catholic” (or “Hilda Protestant”). Well, obviously, Joe cannot marry Hilda in the presence of a priest. (We Catholics take marriage seriously! You cannot take on a second wife unless you are free from your first wife, and you are free from your first wife only if she dies or if the Catholic Church declares that your marriage to her was null and void.) So, Joe and Hilda arrange to get married by Pastor Leroy, who has no qualms about performing marriage ceremonies for divorced persons, is not particular about religious affiliations or doctrines and is willing to marry just about anyone who says “please”.
Here are two important points based on this fictitious (but not preposterous) example: (a) The marriage of Joe and Hilda will NOT be valid, i.e. they will not be married in the eyes of God; (b) Joe Catholic’s relatives and friends who give a hoot about their religion will not attend Joe and Hilda’s wedding. One of the ways we honor marriage is by not honoring invalid marriage. But notice I did not say that we should ever be mean or unloving to Joe or Hilda or poor old Jane!

                      stjos/stvdp: 07.04.2010 - 08   

   

        

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